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  1. #11

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    I've used vinegar as stop bath before when printing, but I haven't tried it with film, I usually just use water.

  2. #12

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    I check the label on the vinegar and dilute to 1.5%

  3. #13

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    Stop bath is often cheaper than food grade vinegar, and has an indicating dye that signals exhaustion. Why use vinegar? Makes no sense.

  4. #14

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    Nearest source here for stop is? Your guess is better then mine.

    If when I knew the closest source it was a good 10-15 minute drive.

    OTOH I've never seen 5% vinegar or even better 7% pickling vinegar at even close to the cost of stop bath. Maybe the stuff is much more expensive in the US then it was in Canada? Last 7% I bought was less then $1 for 5 litres.

  5. #15
    bessa_L_R3a's Avatar
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    I just use tap water for 30 seconds with constant agitation. Negs seem to come out fine ...

    I'm typically developing 35mm 400 iso black and white in HC 110

  6. #16

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    If you have concluded that stop is worthwhile then just a thought but this is where being in the U.K. might make it worthless. I'd search out a "homebrew" store - the kind that sells ingredients for making beer and wine. They usually have large bags of citric acid powder at reasonable prices. About 15 grammes per litre is about right for prints, not sure about film but exact quantities around this figure may not be important. If such stores aren't within easy reach then mail order might be next option. Powder is easy to transport and you're not paying for the weight of water.

    pentaxuser

  7. #17

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    I have not used a stop bath or even vinegar when processing my film. I have only processed about 5 rolls of film so far, but the worker at Freestyle told me to use some vinegar the next time. I was wondering what the benefits were. So far my negatives seem fine, so I won't be using a stop bath or vinegar. Plain ole' water works

    Thanks for your help and suggestions,

    Jason

  8. #18
    Ed Sukach's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by fschifano View Post
    Stop bath is often cheaper than food grade vinegar, and has an indicating dye that signals exhaustion. Why use vinegar? Makes no sense.
    Why?

    Lets see ... "Food grade vinegar" (what other grades are there?) requires only an additional line on our family weekly grocery list ... as opposed to a moderately long excursion to a specialty photographic store - or an inclusion on a list to one of the large mail order houses and a possible shipping charge increase. Do they - is this - concentrated acetic acid -one of the regulated substances that can only be shipped by "ground?"
    Additionally, I have no need for an indicator function - as I use all my chemistry in "one-shot" mode only -- my indulgence of my obsession with perfection.

    Besides - I don't like the skull and bones on the label of Indicating Stop Bath.
    Carpe erratum!!

    Ed Sukach, FFP.

  9. #19

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    Well, if you work the numbers, you'll see. Normalize the cost of the stop bath vs. vinegar. Stop bath is diluted 1+63, while 5% vinegar is diluted to something like 1+4. As for the skull and crossbones; if food grade vinegar was at 28% it would be wearing a skull and crossbones on the label too.

  10. #20
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    There are two grades of vinegar. One is brown undistilled apple cider or wine vinegar and the other is white distilled vinegar which costs more. You cannot use the undistilled version, only the white (clear) distilled version. Please don't mistake these two versions.

    PE

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