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  1. #1
    Jorge Oliveira's Avatar
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    I've developed yesterday nigh a Tmax 100 35mm film.
    HC-110, Dil B 6 min, 21 C, agitation 5 full inversion of the tank each minute.

    Never before saw such a problem neg.

    - Streaks all over, side to side between perforations.
    - A whitish/brownish very dense spot (changes with light angle) at the side, between frame and perforation.
    - a milky streak some 3/4 inches long between film perforation and outside.

    If this was not enough, due to a camera battery problem 3 frames were grossly underexposed.

    ))-:

    Well, in your opinion would the above be related to development or the film itself?


    Thanks for any help,

    Jorge O

  2. #2

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    If I were hazarding a guess, I would say that you have a problem with your processing procedures.
    Art is a step from what is obvious and well-known toward what is arcane and concealed.

    Visit my website at http://www.donaldmillerphotography.com

  3. #3
    Silverpixels5's Avatar
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    Perhaps there was something wrong with the developer. Also you may not be giving it proper agitation. Unidirectional agitation can sometimes cause streaks.

  4. #4
    David A. Goldfarb's Avatar
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    Milky streaks are usually from inadequate fixing due to the film sticking together in the tank. I'd guess you didn't load the film on the reel properly.

    Sacrifice a roll of film and practice in the light until you can do it with your eyes closed before processing your next roll of film. If you don't process film with some frequency (at least weekly), it is possible to get out of practice, so if that's the case, you might want to practice loading film onto reels occasionally between film processing sessions or take more pictures!

  5. #5
    Jorge Oliveira's Avatar
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    Thanks, guys

    I've just forgot to mention that this was a reloaded cannister and the film went loose at rewind time...

    All in a single day...Should have gone fishing.

    So I had to load the tank using a changing bag, pulling the film out of the camera and something went avoc.

    Let's hope I'm luckier next time...

    Jorge O



 

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