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  1. #11

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    Oriental WT FB is an extremely warm paper. I've tested most papers on the market today, and Oriental's WT is almost a yellow/green in the mid tones. I think Amidol/Ansco130 are typically "cool tone" developers, but that's just what I know from what I've heard. Maybe the combination of both knocks down the "warmth" of Oriental's paper to a level pleasing to your eye. I've tried it with Ilford CT developer and it seemed to do that. Hey someone with some more background in chemistry want to tell me if there's any relevancy to this or am I just sniffing too much fix?

  2. #12
    Will S's Avatar
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    I seem to remember that Ansco 130 at a weaker dilution will give warmer tones. I think straight or 1:1 for normal, and 1:2 for warm tones. Or were you using it diluted already?

    Thanks,

    Will
    "I am an anarchist." - HCB
    "I wanna be anarchist." - JR

  3. #13
    dpurdy's Avatar
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    It is funny this thread that I started went a different direction than I intended. Actually I didn't really expect it to go any direction. I know how to make warm tone developers and I use Potassium bromide all the time I just had never referred to it as KBr.

    I was only trying to share what I found to be amusing and interesting info about using tea in the process. I was testing side by side Amidol and Glycin to see if I liked one better than the other in reaction to a previous thread about Amidol. Print warmth wasn't my concern, I was looking for depth of tone and trying to see if I could see the supposed 3D affect of using acid ballanced Amidol.

    I used to use amidol a lot with old Portriga and it was very neutral. I was surprised with the Oriental WT that it was quite cold. It did have wonderful tonality and brilliant highlight seperation. Then I tried the same print using a new jar of Glycin. I like the 130 formula but had been using it with an old bottle of glycin that was mediium brown color in the jar. The new glycin gave prints that weren't as warm as the old glycin and I figured it must be due to less stain. I must have been picking up some sort of stain from the dark brown developer.

    Then I made a pot of tea and while doing that I thought what if I poured tea into the developer for a stainer. It might work with the Acid ballanced Amidol but it would kill the 130. then I thought why couldn't I just pour tea in the stop bath, it is acid ballanced. So I put an extra tea bag in my pot and made it stronger then brewed it up normal and then just poured it all right into the stop bath. It made my stop bath have the pleasant smell of tea.

    But the interesting thing is how well it worked. And it was variable. If I stopped for just 20 seconds it didn't stain at all. If I stopped for a full minute I got a very nice warm print and if I stopped for 2 minutes it was rich and warm almost like an ivory colored platinum print. And it didn't have a stained look to it as much as a toned look. I have printed like this for 2 days now and matted some of the prints in neutral white mats and they are quite beautiful in color. The most interesting is a too dark print that was processed in Amidol that I put in the tea and left a long time.

    http://dennispurdy.com/amidolandtea.html

    I couldn't get the scan to quite match the print and you can see a bit of uneveness in the stain because I put this one in the stop/tea and left it with no agitation.

    Anyway I know lots of people stain in tea and this is no news to them.

    Dennis

  4. #14
    Jim Fitzgerald's Avatar
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    Dennis, very cool. I may have to give this a try.

    JIm

  5. #15
    c6h6o3's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Paul Verizzo View Post
    Good work!
    Yeah, they just don't come any better.

  6. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by dpurdy View Post
    Truly beautiful print color. I shall try it with Michael Smith's formula. What is Yorkshire Red? I want to try to duplicate the tea as closely as possible.

    BTW, I don't think the print is too dark at all.

  7. #17
    Alex Hawley's Avatar
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    Beautiful print Dennis.

    I've always found Smith's amidol formula to be quite receptive to adding KBr to increase warmth. Pretty much get whatever kind of effect I want. This depends a lot on the paper too. Anso 130 is less receptive to warming but at 1:2 with 20 ml or more additional KBr, I can improve warmth slightly. Again. the paper itself is always a big factor.
    Semper Fi & God Bless America
    My Photography Blog

  8. #18
    dpurdy's Avatar
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    [QUOTE=c6h6o3;611859]Truly beautiful print color. I shall try it with Michael Smith's formula. What is Yorkshire Red? I want to try to duplicate the tea as closely as possible.


    Ok (presuming you aren't just taking the piss out of me.) (which I need from time to time) Yorkshire red is a black tea with a reddish tint but I don't think that is important. I put the info in because I know it is a popular variety in England and it is difficult to find quality tea in the US and when you do find it it is very expensive. So don't use it. I think any black tea would come close to the same color so go for cheap stuff. For the record I actually did use Yorkshire Red because I have some gone stale. And the color of the print really didn't come across in my scan and jpeg. It is much richer and a bit more redish brown in reality.
    thanks Dennis

  9. #19
    dpurdy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Alex Hawley View Post
    Beautiful print Dennis.

    I've always found Smith's amidol formula to be quite receptive to adding KBr to increase warmth. Pretty much get whatever kind of effect I want. This depends a lot on the paper too. Anso 130 is less receptive to warming but at 1:2 with 20 ml or more additional KBr, I can improve warmth slightly. Again. the paper itself is always a big factor.
    I don't have a lot of Amidol formulas on hand and I was looking for one that was supposed to develop bottom up due to the PH of the gelatin acting as a restrainer. The one I do have that says it works that way is very simple with just a lot of Sodium sulfite (125 grams) and sodium bisulfite (50 grams) and 15 grams Amidol to make a liter of working solution. I thought of adding some Potas Bromide to it but I didn't want to mess with the ph of the formula for my experiment.

    Usually when I mix Ansco 130 I customize it a bit by increasing the Hydroquinone and decreasing the sodium carbonate and increasing the postassium bromide to make it go warm and it seems to work.
    Dennis

  10. #20
    Alex Hawley's Avatar
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    As far as I know, all amidol formulas develop from the bottom up so to speak. Smith's amidol contains some citric acid which prolongs the working life by reducing the the oxidation of the mixture due to air absorption. It uses a minimum of 4 ml (going off memory here) KBr per liter but you can increase the KBr as desired to adjust warmth. You can get at least 24 hours, usually 30 hours solution life.
    Last edited by Alex Hawley; 04-04-2008 at 02:57 PM. Click to view previous post history. Reason: typo
    Semper Fi & God Bless America
    My Photography Blog

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