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  1. #1
    dpurdy's Avatar
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    Amidol, Ansco 130 and a cup of tea

    Yesterday I spent comparing Amidol and Ansco 130 on Oriental WT FB. I mixed the amidol in a formula with only sodium sulfite and sodium bisulfite and the Ansco was the standard formula. Neither was giving me enough warmth. The Amidol was surprisingly cold and the 130 with fresh bright white Glycin wasn't as nice as the old chocolate colored stuff I ran out of. I thought maybe a bit of stain would help so I boiled up a pot of tea (Yorkshire Red) double strength and just poured it into the stop bath. I figured what the heck it's acid isn't it. It worked amazingly well. If I wanted to keep the print unchanged I just stopped for 20 seconds, if I wanted a nice warm paper tone I left it in the stop for a minute and if I wanted a very rich warm color I left it in two minutes. It didn't actually make prints that looked stained, they just looked like very warm prints. Looking at them again today in neutral colored mats they are beautiful and glowing and very warm. I started another printing session this morning and just kept using the same tea stop bath and it still is working great.

    Thought I would pass that along. Maybe of no interest to anyone.
    Dennis

  2. #2
    Anscojohn's Avatar
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    Amidol has always been the developer of choice for the coldest tones on bromide papers. If you want warmth, amidol is not where it's at.

    John, Mount Vernon, Virginia USA

  3. #3
    c6h6o3's Avatar
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    With KBr in the amidol solution you can get nice warm tones on bromide papers.

  4. #4
    dpurdy's Avatar
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    What is KBr? My attempt to research it is not working out very well.
    Thanks Dennis

  5. #5
    c6h6o3's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dpurdy View Post
    What is KBr? My attempt to research it is not working out very well.
    Thanks Dennis
    Potassium Bromide. It acts as a restrainer and warms color. Use a 10% solution in your print developer working solution.

  6. #6
    Anscojohn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by c6h6o3 View Post
    With KBr in the amidol solution you can get nice warm tones on bromide papers.
    ******
    And I always thought it was the desire for those cold, steely, black, Weston-like tones that drove folks to amidol. Well, shows how little I know.

    John, Mount Vernon, Virginia USA

  7. #7
    c6h6o3's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Anscojohn View Post
    ******
    And I always thought it was the desire for those cold, steely, black, Weston-like tones that drove folks to amidol. Well, shows how little I know.

    John, Mount Vernon, Virginia USA
    Some of his are colder than others. A few of the very best ones have an almost golden hue to them. But I've seen some that were downright blue they were so cold.

  8. #8
    c6h6o3's Avatar
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    Take a look at these, all printed on Azo in amidol. Granted, Azo is a silver chloride paper, but I've gotten warm tones with Kentona in amidol. I think that's a chloro-bromide paper. (I'm not sure though. Somebody familiar with Kentmere stuff correct me.) Steve hates cold tones.

  9. #9

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    Nice!

    Quote Originally Posted by c6h6o3 View Post
    Take a look at these, all printed on Azo in amidol. Granted, Azo is a silver chloride paper, but I've gotten warm tones with Kentona in amidol. I think that's a chloro-bromide paper. (I'm not sure though. Somebody familiar with Kentmere stuff correct me.) Steve hates cold tones.
    Good work!

  10. #10

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    Yes, I can alter 'warmth' / tone with kbr as well with Azo.

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