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  1. #11

    Join Date
    May 2005
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    Daventry, Northamptonshire, England
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    It's a very "broad" question. I can only speak for the big three ( Ilford, Kodak and Fuji). The quality and consistency is good for all 3. The older technology films such as Ilford HP5+ and FP4, probably allow greater latitude on both exposure and developer to be used in terms of producing good results.

    Ilford HP5+ may not be particularly cheap or as available in the U.S as in the U.K. and some of the Ilford developers may be difficult to get but if Perceptol and HP5+ are available then for some loss of speed( anything between EI 320 and 250)from the box speed of 400 you'll get remarkably small grain, great latitude on exposure and a great tonal range.

    pentaxuser

  2. #12
    arigram's Avatar
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    Sep 2004
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    Crete, Greece
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    If you learn how to expose and develop, you can't go wrong with any.
    They all have different properties and characteristics, so its about finding which ones suit your aesthetics and technique.
    aristotelis grammatikakis
    www.arigram.gr
    Real photographs, created in camera, 100% organic,
    no digital additives and shit




  3. #13
    Guillaume Zuili's Avatar
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    Aug 2005
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    Another vote for TX400, you can't go wrong. It's one of the best and could do almost anything.
    If you want slow, FP4.
    If you want some character Efke25.

  4. #14

    Join Date
    Mar 2008
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    Southern Indiana
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    thanxs for the replies everyone. I develop 2 rolls of 400 tx and done the same thing while developing, and didn't realize what happen until after the second roll was hanging to dry. I was using the wrong time chart for D76 (oops) so my films was coming out under develop. think I'll start using d76 straight for 6 3/4 minutes because that was the time i was using for d76 1:1 which the time for it is 9 3/4 minutes.

    the second roll didn't look as bad as the first one did but it was still way to grainy. I'll have to pay allot more attention to developing time on the films I do use. I that would explain me being absent minded twice today when it came to developing these films, earlier today and this evening. I think for now I'll stick with TRI-X, and pick up a roll of ilford off and on.

  5. #15

    Join Date
    Jan 2007
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    I use almost only TriX, in my opinion one of the best all-around film you may find.
    Sometime I would like a little less evident grain and all the rumors around the new TMax 400 make it so attractive that in the near future I will try it. But until then no change: TriX.




    Elia

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