Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 70,000   Posts: 1,524,354   Online: 834
      
Page 6 of 6 FirstFirst 123456
Results 51 to 60 of 60
  1. #51
    df cardwell's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Dearborn,Michigan & Cape Breton Island
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    3,342
    Images
    8
    The EASIEST way to replenish at home is to use XTOL: the developer is also the replenisher.

    Mix the 5 liters and decant it. Set aside a bottle that holds enough for you tank. Label it "WORK".
    ( call it that because you hope that's what it will do !)

    To 'season' the Working solution, soak a couple rolls of old film in the solution. Then, follow PHOTOTONE's directions. Kodak published good data on XTOL as a replenisher:

    http://www.kodak.com/global/en/profe.../j109/j109.pdf

    ( the 'seasoning' reduces the activity of the fresh developer a little bit, and in a few rolls you'll balance the pld developer with the new, and development times will stabilize. It can be worth bother if you like putting a little effort into the process. )

    Share the results !

  2. #52
    jd callow's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Milan
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    8,002
    Images
    117
    Quote Originally Posted by df cardwell View Post
    Thanks. Callow said there would be beer...
    I lied. Great to see you posting though!

    *

  3. #53
    Anscojohn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    2,727
    Images
    13
    Someone posted: Quote on If one souped their own film, it was nearly always D-76 1+1. Everybody had their own technique, and since they were working pros, consistent results were more important than 'perfect negs'. Quote off.
    ************************************************** **********
    Check out Gene Smith's Minimata series. He souped in D76 2:1, and wrote that for them he always added a little bit of used developer "to take the edge off the grain."

    More than one old lab rat with whom I worked in the early 1960s told me that "ya allways gotta add a little bitta used '76 to the fresh stuff."

    Me? I keep it simple. I use replenished D23. I have a forgiving wife and need a forgiving film developer.
    Last edited by Anscojohn; 05-01-2008 at 08:03 PM. Click to view previous post history.
    John, Mount Vernon, Virginia USA

  4. #54
    Lee L's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    3,244
    Quote Originally Posted by jd callow View Post
    I lied. Great to see you posting though!
    No you didn't. I'm so happy to see Don posting to APUG again that I'm going to go crack a cold one. Don could get here by midnight if he left right now. I'll save a couple.

    Lee

  5. #55
    df cardwell's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Dearborn,Michigan & Cape Breton Island
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    3,342
    Images
    8
    Quote Originally Posted by Anscojohn View Post
    Check out Gene Smith's Minimata series.

    ..... "ya allways gotta add a little bitta used '76 to the fresh stuff."

    .... I use replenished D23.
    Yes, Yes, and Yes.

    There's a bit of sourdough baking in this, or having a stockpot or fricot simmering on the back of the stove. The attention you give it creates a commitment to your process, and that in turn reduces the attention you have for chasing after a new formulae and gadgets.

    And the magic happens when all these limitations free you as an artist.

    It could give me nightmares, thinking about Gene Smith in a metaphysical breakdown, paralyzed over the choice between D-76 vs Supernol or something.

    And never making the picture of Tomoko and her mother.

  6. #56
    Lee L's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    3,244
    Quote Originally Posted by df cardwell View Post
    And the magic happens when all these limitations free you as an artist.
    I've really only done one "official" photography workshop, almost 30 years ago. All the photographers and cameras were different, but the film and developer were the same, even the EI was prescribed, requirements designed to keep people concentrated on seeing, and to get everyone past the point of hobbling concerns about film and developer.

    Tri-X and D-76 1:1, processed by the workshop organizer while we were out shooting that morning's "assignment".

    Lee
    Last edited by Lee L; 05-01-2008 at 09:03 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  7. #57
    jd callow's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Milan
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    8,002
    Images
    117
    Sometimes ignorance is bliss. One of my favorite photographers knows just enough about developing film to produce her work (see the portaits of me here). This is off topic and does nothing to bring the OP closer to reproducing the look of another age.

    *

  8. #58
    Anscojohn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    2,727
    Images
    13
    [
    And the magic happens when all these limitations free you as an artist.

    It could give me nightmares, thinking about Gene Smith in a metaphysical breakdown, paralyzed over the choice between D-76 vs Supernol or something.

    And never making the picture of Tomoko and her mother.[/QUOTE]


    ****
    Yes to your comments. Probably the D76 2:1 worked out something like Ansco 47 or something.
    He knew the importance of just getting an image on film, often, he wrote, saying to himself "Oh, Hell, I'll just print it." Tedium, sometimes patience, cussedness, and lots of ferricyanide to open up the shadows served him well. He had a strong committment to the message and, as you say, made everyday materials work for him.
    John, Mount Vernon, Virginia USA

  9. #59
    Lee L's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    3,244
    Quote Originally Posted by jd callow View Post
    Sometimes ignorance is bliss. One of my favorite photographers knows just enough about developing film to produce her work (see the portaits of me here). This is off topic and does nothing to bring the OP closer to reproducing the look of another age.
    And to take it even more off topic: Where's the egg?

    Lee

  10. #60

    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    269
    What I've been doing for the past while is use stock D76. I pour the D76 in a liter bottle, and when I develop my film pour as much as possible into my 2 roll patterson tank (it takes about 850ml or so). I then develop and pour it back into the 1L bottle. I process 5 rolls this way, and then throw out the developer; I don't increase the development time. I find that across the 5 rolls the development is very consistent.

Page 6 of 6 FirstFirst 123456


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin