Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 71,867   Posts: 1,583,225   Online: 977
      
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 15
  1. #1

    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    123

    Ortho film + dark blue filter for special effects?

    Hi everyone,

    I just got an idea. I want to setup a model sitting on a red chair and on a red background. I want the backgroud and the chair to disappear (to be totally black). In other words, I want to create the illusion that the model is sitting on nothing and that no forms except his/her body will be visible on the final print.

    Can I expect to succed by using a blue filter and Ortho film?

    If yes, what kind of ortho film should I use?

    And what kind of red paint should I use too? I guess it will have to be really mat an really dark.

    Thanks a lot!

    Kris

  2. #2
    tim_walls's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Croydon & Leeds
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    1,037
    Images
    48
    Without wanting to sound totally dense...

    Wouldn't a black chair on a black background be equally helpful? :-)
    Another day goes under; a little bourbon will take the strain...

  3. #3
    Jim Noel's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    1,905
    Blog Entries
    1
    If you want to try this with ortho film, I suggest Ilford Ortho +. The filter should make little if any difference since ortho film is sensitive ONLY to blue light.
    [FONT=Comic Sans MS]Films NOT Dead - Just getting fixed![/FONT]

  4. #4
    Gary Holliday's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Belfast, UK exiled in Cambridge UK.
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    816
    No matter what film or filters you use, you will still see the chair if there is light shining on it.

  5. #5
    keithwms's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Charlottesville, Virginia
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    6,079
    Blog Entries
    20
    Images
    129
    What you can expect with blue-filtered ortho film is for the model's skin to look like leather.
    "Only dead fish follow the stream"

    [APUG Portfolio] [APUG Blog] [Website]

  6. #6

    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    OH
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    1,789
    Images
    2
    Mmmm... leather...

    I agree, if you're going to use a really dark blue filter, you can just shoot in regular film - no need to go ortho.

    Maybe black background, black stool, and red filter? I don't know, I'm just tossing ideas out there.

  7. #7

    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    1,051
    Hmmm, slightly low contrast first print, cut it out, press it down, re-photograph ? Or use a large-format interneg with opaque painted on, or use lith film as a burn-in neg for the background (assuming you can register it on the neg-stage).

    As the ortho-film is sensitive to the blue end of the spectrum anyway, using a blue filter won't make an enormous contrast change - except to the opposite-to-blue bits of the scene, such as the model (paint the model blue ???) . . . .

    Really, any coloured filter will pass a small amount of light from the rest of the spectrum (even RGB filters, for printing-separations, still pass a tiny amount when you hold them together) so to hide the chair you would be better off using black. In case of following the re-touching idea, it could be handy to NOT use a chair - instead cantilever a plank of wood through a step-ladder etc (so the end can be sat upon with no visible support) and throw black velvet over everywhere ? Also, limit off-model light so far as possible of course. It is more than 23 years since I was "creative" like that, oops.

  8. #8
    CBG
    CBG is offline

    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    894
    It's MartinP's answer (or, with all due respect to everyone here, photoshop) Last time I did the invisible support thing, I cantilevered the support out from the background to the subject obscured the support. I had it much easier since my subject was only a few ounces in weight.

    C

  9. #9

    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    123

    I will test it

    Thanks for the advice everyone,

    I think I will make some experiments with puppets first. I will try with complete black background and stool, then I will try with Ortho or Std B&W film + dark blue on red background.

    I will try to make it without any touch up first. In this Photoshop world, I want to explore the possibilities of B&W photography without touch ups.

    If you have any other ideas, let me know!

    Kris

  10. #10
    Bobby Ironsights's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Thunder Bay, ON, Canada
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    127
    Images
    6
    Success!

    I've done this, as have many others.I agree with the above, you don't need any sort of special filters. Use a matte black backdrop, and save a little of the fabric to cover the chair or bench you're using.

    Film has a limited latitude, usually only about 3 and a half stops right? What that means is that any object that shows up middle grey at any particular light level, is going to all but disappear with 3 and a half stops less light reflecting from it.

    So, using your handheld light meter as as spotmeter, measure the light on your model so she is at least 4-5 stops less exposed than the fabric.

    Voila, invisible background + backdrop.

    MISTAKES I MADE (and things I should have thought of):

    I'm poor so when I went to the fabric store I bought the cheapest fabric they had, black broadcloth for about $3.50 a yard and my huge backdrop only came to about 50 bucks with lots left over to cover the chair. Unfortunately I hang it against a picture window, and the broadcloth is thin so it allows light through during the day and spoils the effect. I can only use it at night.

    When I hung my backdrop, there were deep folds in it, and in one or two places where the fabric curled outward toward me, on one of the photos I could almost make out a tiny bit of texture in the background. I burned it in, and it didn't show up on the final print though.

    Also, I wish I had lit the models hair a bit better from behind. Her hair was bright red but even Panchromatic black and white is less sensitive to reds than to blues, and it showed up really dark on the film, almost disappearing.

    Also, I overexposed a bit, because I didn't trust the readings my "then new" handheld meter was giving me, and a bit of fabric around the models chairs arms was visible making more burning for me. Next time I'll underexpose by half a stop or a full stop and deal with the thin negs, that should work better.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin