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  1. #11
    Toffle's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fleath View Post
    I actually often find Ilford film easier to load on my steel reels, it feels a bit thicker and stiffer than some other emulsions I use like ERA Pan or Efke. I suppose this could be both good and bad, depending how you do things.
    Yeah, I'm with you on that. I can't recall any trouble I've had with any of the Ilford films. I just picked up a pack of SFX200. I wonder what kind of base this uses.

    If you feel like a stressful evening, try spooling a roll of Maco Cube (isn't that essentially re-branded Efke?) Very thin base. Even worse... but sadly, as its day has passed, is trying to spool 35mm HIE. For me, this film is guaranteed to bring on bouts of swearing and sweaty hands. I've got two rolls still in the freezer waiting for their chance to frustrate me.

    Cheers,
    Tom, on Point Pelee, Canada

    Ansel Adams had the Zone System... I'm working on the points system. First I points it here, and then I points it there...

    http://tom-overton-images.weebly.com


  2. #12
    tiberiustibz's Avatar
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    I started rolling steel reels in september when my photo class taught me and I've never gone back. I had no stickies at all rolling the hp5 in 35mm mostly but also 120 for ~5 months. Now I get a color darkroom in my house and move from a dark closet to a changing bag and my first roll had more sticky than film. It took me a whole hour to roll a 120 roll. I think it's got something to do with the alignment you can get in the closet by letting the film hang straight down in the closet that you can't in an 11x17 darkbag. I'm getting pretty good now though! Out of 4 rolls from a death valley trip of which I mutilated 3, I only lost 4 frames!

  3. #13
    rwyoung's Avatar
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    1) Keep the plastic reels clean. Scrub with an old toothbrush once in a while.
    2) If you have more than one set, don't mix up halves. They SHOULD all be the same from the same manufacturer but it just seems better when you keep them sorted. No physical proof of this, just anecdotal evidence.
    3) Take a small pair of scissors or a nail clipper into the bag with you. After you have cut the film's leading end square, nip just a touch off the two leading corners. Seems to help the snagging in both ball-bearing style and Jobo style plastic reels.

    As far as removing the whole roll from the can or just popping out the leader. I've done both but since none of my 35mm cameras have auto-rewind, I just turn the crank until I hear/feel the pop and stop. Leaves he leader sticking out. YMMV.
    Don't sweat the petty things and don't pet the sweaty things! http://rwyoung.wordpress.com

  4. #14

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    You might want to take more than one reel into your changing bag...guess what, they stick...rather than fussing, go on to the next reel. Too, might want to give your reels a good cleaning sometime soon, soak in a solution of baking soda and scrub them up with a toothbrush. It helps.

  5. #15

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    Dear Robert,

    Don't feel too bad. All film can sometimes refuse to be loaded, and all reels can sometimes refuse to accept film. Some combinations are worse than others and some atmospheric conditions seem to be precursors to trouble.

    If you ever get to work in a big size, really dark, darkroom you can deal with these troubles by making up a big batch of chemistry in 3 containers - 1 litre ice cream tubs work fine -and then throwing the loose film in the dev, stop, and fix for the appropriate times and just sloshing and shaking it around.

    I was reduced to this with a batch of mylar-based 70mm aero film. It was an act of final desperation after the Hewes reels refused to accept the film. I sloshed and swore steadily for 13 minutes but was rewarded with moderately printable negatives.

    I confessed this shameful secret to another photographer and found out that this was a normal procedure for aero film - in the Northwest they used garbage bins as deep tanks for development. You wouldn't believe how short some developing times can be when the darkroom temperature is over 100degrees!

    Uncle Dick

  6. #16
    tiberiustibz's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Uncle Dick View Post
    and then throwing the loose film in the dev, stop, and fix for the appropriate times and just sloshing and shaking it around.
    I love that. I call it the "intelligence of an ape bucket swish method". It does wonders on reversal super 8 film. I did see shattered pieces of silver floating around in the developer afterwards though...

  7. #17
    JBrunner's Avatar
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    I got rid of my plastic reels. I've had trouble from time to time anyway, but much less. The plastic reels are finicky if there is the least bit of moisture. Others seem to use them without trouble, but they vex me to the point of frustration.

  8. #18

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    I've been dealing with this recently.. sometimes the film goes on no problem, sometimes it seems as thought it wants to give me a heart attack

  9. #19

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    First best thing I ever did for developing 35mm was to get Hewes reels. 2nd best thing was to weather strip my bathroom door, throw a towel under either side of it, and put an board across my sink for some counter space. Loading film on reels is so much easier out of that dang bag.

  10. #20
    bessa_L_R3a's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bill Mobbs View Post
    I have never popped open a canister... I use a leader retriever... Cut the leader off and feed the film out of the can and on to the reel.... no mess no sweat. I use both plastic and steel reels, but I do like the steel one better.

    wow i never thought of using that! i'm going to adorama right now to buy one.

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