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  1. #1
    bessa_L_R3a's Avatar
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    arghghghhg!!!!!!!! deliberately exposed roll in fit of rage

    Hi,

    normally i'm a very calm person but tonight i lost it. i was trying to feed film that had been sitting on my desk in its canister for a month or so, not an inordinate amount of time ... i noticed when i sprung the film out of the canister that it wanted to unroll with a passion, more than usual and i could feel it unswirl rapidly (FYI, i was doing this in a changing bag).

    then the real trouble started ... I fed the leader into the plastic reels (which normally work fine) and about a half turn later, i got friction. it wouldn't budge. I had to separate the two halves of the reel and knew if i did that the whole film strip would go haywire in there, which it did. The bag is not that big and I started to sweat. I put the reel back together, found the leader somehow (it was like wrestling with a snake) and started to feed again. More friction! I was getting pissed by the third time, and slightly worried I would have to take the whole bag and contents with my arm stuck in it to some emergency room for photogs.

    By the 5th or 6th attempt, I noticed wretched creases in the normally smooth film surface from so many attempts and even a tear. I was desperate. The inside of the bag was like a moist fog and the sides of the bag were closing in. In the final death throes, I started twisting the film around by force, knowing it wouldn't do any good but ruin it more.

    Finally, in a bit of a rage, I just yanked out the film, pulled out my arms, unzipped the bag, and threw the serpentine film on the bed, watching it, lying there, exposing in agony under my room lights ...

    It felt kind of good in a perverse way. I tried to remember if I had anything good on that roll, and I think there were a few shots that would have been cool. Oh well ...

    I learned a lesson: just be patient, don't take the film out for crying out loud, just take my arms out and wait for my mood to calm down.

    Interestingly, I got another roll onto the same reels with no problem a few minutes later.

    What gives?? I don't get it. The plastic reels are getting a little creaky but they still loaded that second roll fine.

    Still fuming ...

    Robert.

  2. #2

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    Haha, you've perfectly summed up why I avoid roll film and prefer to shoot large format sheets

    I *hate* the sweating-in-the-changing-bag experience, when the film starts to go all haywire and sticky and everything goes to hell...

    Quote Originally Posted by bessa_L_R3a View Post
    Hi,

    normally i'm a very calm person but tonight i lost it. i was trying to feed film that had been sitting on my desk in its canister for a month or so, not an inordinate amount of time ... i noticed when i sprung the film out of the canister that it wanted to unroll with a passion, more than usual and i could feel it unswirl rapidly (FYI, i was doing this in a changing bag).

    then the real trouble started ... I fed the leader into the plastic reels (which normally work fine) and about a half turn later, i got friction. it wouldn't budge. I had to separate the two halves of the reel and knew if i did that the whole film strip would go haywire in there, which it did. The bag is not that big and I started to sweat. I put the reel back together, found the leader somehow (it was like wrestling with a snake) and started to feed again. More friction! I was getting pissed by the third time, and slightly worried I would have to take the whole bag and contents with my arm stuck in it to some emergency room for photogs.

    By the 5th or 6th attempt, I noticed wretched creases in the normally smooth film surface from so many attempts and even a tear. I was desperate. The inside of the bag was like a moist fog and the sides of the bag were closing in. In the final death throes, I started twisting the film around by force, knowing it wouldn't do any good but ruin it more.

    Finally, in a bit of a rage, I just yanked out the film, pulled out my arms, unzipped the bag, and threw the serpentine film on the bed, watching it, lying there, exposing in agony under my room lights ...

    It felt kind of good in a perverse way. I tried to remember if I had anything good on that roll, and I think there were a few shots that would have been cool. Oh well ...

    I learned a lesson: just be patient, don't take the film out for crying out loud, just take my arms out and wait for my mood to calm down.

    Interestingly, I got another roll onto the same reels with no problem a few minutes later.

    What gives?? I don't get it. The plastic reels are getting a little creaky but they still loaded that second roll fine.

    Still fuming ...

    Robert.
    The universe is a haunted house. -Coil
    .

  3. #3
    Sean's Avatar
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    for 35mm, I pop one side of the canister off then grab the film with my fingers as i pull it out, find the lead, then put the film back into the canister with the lead sticking out of the slot. I am then able to keep the film contained while i feed it onto the reel bit by bit.. Otherwise I end up with a mess..

  4. #4
    Mateo's Avatar
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    I would recommend you invest in a leader retriever. And then get rid of the plastic spool.
    "If I only had a brain"-Some badly dressed guy made of straw in some movie I think I saw

  5. #5

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    I tried rolling my first roll of 35mm today in my darkroom and I ended up with more kinks in there than I could have imagined. Talk about uneven development. Thankfully, only a few frames are unusable, but I should have practiced before hand.

    I think I prefer rolling 120 roll film then 35mm film :X

    Jason

  6. #6
    glbeas's Avatar
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    Precisely why I prefer my steel reels.
    Gary Beasley

  7. #7

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    Steel or plastic

    Quote Originally Posted by glbeas View Post
    Precisely why I prefer my steel reels.
    I've had horror stories with both. I think it's Ilford film. Unscientific, but I've had the dickens of a time with their film several times, on both steel and plastic reels. I'll keep my eyes open to see if this holds true.
    In life you only get one great dog, one great car, and one great woman. Pet the dog. Drive the car. Make love to the woman. Don't mix them up.

  8. #8
    Bill Mobbs's Avatar
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    I have never popped open a canister... I use a leader retriever... Cut the leader off and feed the film out of the can and on to the reel.... no mess no sweat. I use both plastic and steel reels, but I do like the steel one better.
    "Nobody is perfect! But even among those that are perfect, some are more perfect than others." Walt Sewell 1947

  9. #9
    Alex Bishop-Thorpe's Avatar
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    I actually often find Ilford film easier to load on my steel reels, it feels a bit thicker and stiffer than some other emulsions I use like ERA Pan or Efke. I suppose this could be both good and bad, depending how you do things.
    Loading film is different for everyone though, I've been developing 35mm film for nearly 2 years and I still screw it up now and then, and I expect I still would in 20 years. Everyone has their own way of doing it and own preferences to the type of reel and so on. There's really no one way of doing anything in photography.
    The Analogue Laboratory, or 'so you built a darkroom in an old factory in the industrial zone'.
    Blog thing!.

    Worry less. Photograph more.

  10. #10

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    One nice thing about stainless tanks is that if you get into trouble, or just need a break, you can stick the film into the tank, with or without the reel, put the lid on and have no worries about light. This is true of some plastic tanks too, that don't require a center core to be light-tight. This gives you a chance to examine the reel if necessary, and make sure that everything is ready for another attempt.

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