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  1. #11
    c6h6o3's Avatar
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    BTW, Aaron VandeSande tells me that the 25 speed Efke fogs even less than the 100.

  2. #12
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    I like the Efke pl100, too, using ABC at 2:1:1:15 - Michael Smith's normal dilution of 1:1:1:7 develops just too fast. I also rate it at 50.

    J&C now has charts of the Efke films up on its site. The pl100, to my unscientific eye, seems to have a very long, straight section with little in the way of shoulders. Perhaps someone with more knowledge can take a look at the charts and explain more of what they might mean.
    juan

  3. #13
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    Actually, I rather like the fact that PL100 goes nuclear in pyro. A nice, dense, full scale negative can be had in about six minutes for an N scene, with very little fog. I have no problem with streaking or uneven development. If, however, any contraction at all is required, I use the 2:1:1:15 dilution. The regular dilution wouldn't even give me enough time to inspect or to react.

  4. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by c6h6o3
    Actually, I rather like the fact that PL100 goes nuclear in pyro. A nice, dense, full scale negative can be had in about six minutes for an N scene, with very little fog. I have no problem with streaking or uneven development. If, however, any contraction at all is required, I use the 2:1:1:15 dilution. The regular dilution wouldn't even give me enough time to inspect or to react.
    Aha.....perhaps the 2:1:1:15 is a better dilution for ABC. I know when I tried the 1:1:1:7 I got uneven developing. Mainly because getting the film out of the developing for inspection caused aerial oxidation. When I did it by time I had no problems, but I like inspecting the film in the last few minutes.

    Don, if you try the J and C 400 film let me know what your times and rating are for pyrocat HD, I would love to have a 400 film for the 12x20 if it rates at 400, a 200 rating is only 2/3 faster than the PW film so is not worth the change for me.

  5. #15
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    Although I've never tried it, a friend sent me some TMY negs developed in both ABC and in Pyrocat HD. They're both gorgeous.

    I never thought to try it because of guilt by association with TMX, but I may just buy a box. Both negatives have virtually zero base fog.

  6. #16

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    I have not compared ABC and PyrocatHD for efffective film speed. However, with most films Pyrocat gives slightly higher effective film speeds than either PMK, Rollo Pyro or WD2D. The difference is greatest with PMK, least with WD2D. However, given the variations in the exact opening of lens apertures and the absolute accuracy of shutter speeds I have my doubts that one could accurately measure these differences with field tests. My own testing is done with a Metrolux integrator that provides repeatable exposures with an accuracy of 1/100 of a second.

    In my opinion the major reason to consider Pyrocat-HD over ABC is the fact that pyrocatechin as a developing agent is cleaner working than pyrogallol and less likely to cause uneven staining or streaking. It is also quite inexpensive to use, especially if mixed from scratch. And Pyrocat-HD is the only staining developer that I personally would recommend for rotary processing. With rotary processing, however, I do recommend a pre-soak of 3-5 minutes.

    Sandy King

  7. #17

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    Jorge, I may very well try the Classic 400 from J&C on my next order. I have had problems with the 12X20 PW film on my first 12 sheets. I don't know whether they sent me the wrong film or what. They were supposed to replace the film but I haven't seen the replacement film yet. A faster film would be nice with the wind I have to contend with up this way. I am going to check with John before I order next time to see what others are shooting his 400 film at.

    C6, Thanks for the "heads up" on the Efke-Classic comparison and expansion characteristics of both films. That will be something for me to seriously consider on my next order. Did you shoot Bergger before? What was your comparative analysis of the Classic to Bergger?
    Art is a step from what is obvious and well-known toward what is arcane and concealed.

    Visit my website at http://www.donaldmillerphotography.com

  8. #18

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    Sandy,
    I received notice of your intent to test Classic 200 and Pyrocat. If you would be so kind, please post the results of your tests. I know that I for one would appreciate the results of your tests.
    Art is a step from what is obvious and well-known toward what is arcane and concealed.

    Visit my website at http://www.donaldmillerphotography.com

  9. #19

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jorge
    I know when I tried the 1:1:1:7 I got uneven developing. Mainly because getting the film out of the developing for inspection caused aerial oxidation. When I did it by time I had no problems, but I like inspecting the film in the last few minutes.
    Interesting comment, Jorge. I also develop by inspection, so I suspected several times DBI to be responsible for uneven development with ABC, but I really can't be sure, I had problems with time and temp development. And as I said, main part of the problems disappeared extending presoaking times. Inspection only takes a few seconds per film, is it enough for streaks or uneven development ?

  10. #20

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    I also thought that DBI was causing the uneven development, so I did some sheets by time & temperature and got the same problem. To rule out uneven staining, I processed on sheet in a tray by just rocking the tray. Same stuff. I am inclined toward the presoak theory at present. I just processed 7 sheets of 8x20. Handling the film was very slow so the first sheets into the presoak were in there a fairly long time. Now I can't say for sure which sheets were which, but some of the films came out perfect and others had varying amounts of mottling. It was as if the motting was inversely proportional to the time spent in the presoak. I will pursue this further. I will also start using metaborate in my presoak again.

    Thanks,
    Paul Hamann

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