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  1. #1

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    have a question on film storage

    what is good to store film, in the refridgerator or freezer, because I like to start stocking up on 35mm film. But not sure how to cold storage the film. If the fridge is used how long should I wait for the roll come up to room temp, and pretty much the same for freezer if that is suggested.

  2. #2

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    just realize the typo in the subject line, with the word have

  3. #3
    Jim Noel's Avatar
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    Freeze it in original container.
    [FONT=Comic Sans MS]Films NOT Dead - Just getting fixed![/FONT]

  4. #4

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bobby L. View Post
    what is good to store film, in the refridgerator or freezer, because I like to start stocking up on 35mm film. But not sure how to cold storage the film. If the fridge is used how long should I wait for the roll come up to room temp, and pretty much the same for freezer if that is suggested.
    Freeze it, and allow at least 2 hours for warm-up before opening.
    "Pictures are not incidental frills to a text; they are essences of our distinctive way of knowing." Stephen J. Gould

  5. #5

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    Dear Bobby,

    I use a mini fridge so film goes in both the refrigeration and freezer compartments just because of the room needed. I solve the warm up problem by always having a few rolls at room temperature. On grand occasion, I will take a 35mm roll right from the fridge or freezer and warm it up on a heat register or hair dryer (carefully, still in the box, or at least the plastic container). Remember to shoot fast film as fresh as possible unless you are going for the big grain look.

    Neal Wydra

  6. #6

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    Note that refrigerating or freezing film will help it last longer, but not indefinitely. Once manufactured, film is slowly fogged by cosmic rays even when frozen. This effect is more pronounced for fast films than for slow films. Thus, I wouldn't recommend stocking up on fast film just for the heck of it; but if you see a bargain or hear that your favorite film has been discontinued, by all means buy it and freeze it, particularly if it's a slow film.

  7. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by srs5694 View Post
    ...film is slowly fogged by cosmic rays even when frozen. This effect is more pronounced for fast films than for slow films....
    I too, believe this is true, but have know idea how long it would take. It's those damn neutrinos! I've heard that they can pass through miles of lead, or anything, even planets - no stopping them.
    "Pictures are not incidental frills to a text; they are essences of our distinctive way of knowing." Stephen J. Gould

  8. #8

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    k thanxs for the info. as far as film speed, right now I'm working with 100 and 400. maybe one day I'll shoot a roll of high speed. I have 9 rolls on the way now, and planning on using most of them at the kentucky derby festival balloon glow on april 25. But I do want to stock up a little bit on films so that I can have it on hand when I need it.

  9. #9
    PhotoJim's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by panastasia View Post
    I too, believe this is true, but have know idea how long it would take. It's those damn neutrinos! I've heard that they can pass through miles of lead, or anything, even planets - no stopping them.
    Actually, it's gamma radiation that's the problem. The neutrinos don't cause measurable harm. You can store film deep underground for many years.

    It doesn't take all that long, unfortunately. Faster films (ISO 800 and faster) will show the effects in a year or two. Slower films show the damage more slowly. Very slow films (50 and less) may take many years to show any damage.
    Jim MacKenzie - Regina, Saskatchewan, Canada

    A bunch of Nikons; Feds, Zorkis and a Kiev; Pentax 67-II (inherited from my deceased father-in-law); Bronica SQ-A; and a nice Shen Hao 4x5 field camera with 3 decent lenses that needs to be taken outside more. Oh, and as of mid-2012, one of those bodies we don't talk about here.

    Favourite film: do I need to pick only one?

  10. #10

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    hmm, metres of lead seems to be a convenient way of stopping the gamma radiation.

    but if i've got film lying around, would I be better off keeping it out or in the freezer or fridge?

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