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  1. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by tiberiustibz View Post
    I
    Rolling back to back? you'd need 12 exposure rolls to fit on a 36 unless you're using the ilford 72 frame ones. The advantage being you can now fit 16 rolls of film in an 8 roll can.
    I don't think you understand the concept.
    The films roll into the same spiral, just back to back.

    Why bother?

    tim in san jose
    Where ever you are, there you be.

  2. #12

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    Practice on a dummy roll over and over again.

    There should be no tension on the film once loaded. The roll should end about where the reel ends, and the film should feel like it is loosely fitting on the reel.
    When I grow up, I want to be a photographer.

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  3. #13

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    when the cut end of the film is in the clip feel the edges with your fingers
    ( with your dummy roll and the lights you can see this how the film looks
    when it is clipped straight vs. crooked ) it is easy to notice when the film
    isn't clipped straight. when you hold the film tight, and slightly curved
    it will easily slide on the reel as it is supposed to, you can push the film
    back/ towards the center, and feel it move back and forth freely, you haven't made
    any mistakes. once you practice a few times, and see what you are doing
    right / wrong it is easy to understand how to do it. i wouldn't bother leaving the
    tongue out of your film spool. it isn't worth the trouble and is much easier to
    pop the top off of the cartridge pull the film out, trim the end off and feed it into
    the reel ...

    videos, and threads ( here ) aren't going to help you as much
    as sacrificing a roll of film and just doing it ...

    good luck!

    john
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  4. #14
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    Very important: Don't squeeze the film as you're loading. Just hold the edges loosely and guide the film onto the reel.
    Mike Richards' Mobile Me gallery, including the Holocaust and Turkey Expo.

  5. #15

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    Loading steel reels is 100 times easier than plastic, IMO. The 120-format rolls can be a bit of a challenge. That said, I roll both 120-film and 135-film back to back on Hewes steel reels. I've had a few mess-ups with 120-film, but never with 135-film.

    Practice in the light. I a few tries you'll be the master. :-)
    Be careful his bow tie is really a camera
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  6. #16
    CBG
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    Quote Originally Posted by fschifano View Post
    Sacrifice a cheap roll of film and practice, practice, practice. Before you know it, you'll be able to do it from scratch in the dark. If that doesn't work, consider a high quality reel like Hewes. These are almost foolproof because they are built to exacting standards and quality control. They are more expensive, but worth every penny.
    The above is the best advise you'll ever get. Waste one roll to practice. Use it till you could load film in a shoebox. Practice in the light first, then in the light with your eyes closed, and only then in a changing bag.

    Get the feel of it down cold before you start to adapt your skill to working a changing bag. There's a "feel" to loading that you'll never forget.

    I'm one more who says stainless is best. You're not dependant upon film slithering all the way friction free.


    Quote Originally Posted by k_jupiter View Post
    roll into the same spiral, just back to back. Why bother?
    Back to back is just an old time saving "trick". Sometimes the time saved is vital. I'm not sure I'd want to load back to back in a changing bag without sacrificing two rolls and a bit of practice....

    Best,

    C

  7. #17

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    Or, just use a high quality plastic system.

    In terms of ease of use, SS reels make zero sense. I know there are many who say that plastic doesn't work for them, but that's like saying it's harder to use an automatic transmission than a stick shift. I chose the latter for my Jeep, but that doesn't mean I would claim it to be easier. The only failure ever possible with a plastic ratchet reel system is easily avoided: if it stops going in easily, something is wrong. A reel with a bit of moisture can do that. But you know this before it ever goes into the soup, unlike a SS reel where you discover the error after fixing.

    SS reels are expensive and are easily bent. (Oops!) 120 film is hard to do, I even have a 120 film loader device. Even such a thing as the brand of film and its backing can change the degree of diffiulty.

    I keep my SS reels and tanks to look at. They look very professional and are very pretty.

    I use my Yankee reel and tank for the "reel" world.

  8. #18
    CBG
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    Quote Originally Posted by Paul Verizzo View Post
    In terms of ease of use, SS reels make zero sense. I know there are many who say that plastic doesn't work for them, but that's like saying it's harder to use an automatic transmission than a stick shift. I chose the latter for my Jeep, but that doesn't mean I would claim it to be easier. The only failure ever possible with a plastic ratchet reel system is easily avoided: if it stops going in easily, something is wrong. A reel with a bit of moisture can do that. But you know this before it ever goes into the soup, unlike a SS reel where you discover the error after fixing.

    SS reels are expensive and are easily bent. (Oops!) 120 film is hard to do, I even have a 120 film loader device. Even such a thing as the brand of film and its backing can change the degree of diffiulty.

    I keep my SS reels and tanks to look at. They look very professional and are very pretty.

    I use my Yankee reel and tank for the "reel" world.
    I guess the plastic reels make sense for some, but metal reels are practically free nowadays, easy not to bend with minimal care and easy to use for most folks. I'm a terminal clutz and used the old reels without clips or hooks with no trouble and did back to back etc with little fuss.

    If you're dropping and bending reels, you're going to smash the plastic reels sometime.

    C

  9. #19

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    "120 film is hard to do, I even have a 120 film loader device. Even such a thing as the brand of film and its backing can change the degree of diffiulty."

    Good Morning,

    Agree and disagree. In my opinion, loading 120 film onto a SS reel is generally the dead simplest darkroom procedure going (220 is another story). I do agree, however, that some films are somewhat easier to load than others. I've never had trouble with Kodak or Ilford, but the very flexible, thin-base Foma 200 does require a bit more care. The most important thing is to use reels with a positive locking mechanism in the center, such as the Kinderman-type puncturing pin instead of the Nikor-type springy-thingy.

    Konical

  10. #20

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    Quote Originally Posted by Paul Verizzo View Post
    120 film is hard to do, I even have a 120 film loader device. Even such a thing as the brand of film and its backing can change the degree of diffiulty.
    I agree with the second sentence, but the first one astonishes me. Maybe I've just been lucky in my choice of 120 reels, or something, but based on my own experience I can't imagine finding it harder to load than 35mm. The space between "tracks" of the reel is so generous that it's hard to get misaligned, and if it does happen, I can feel it immediately.

    What do you find goes wrong? The film "derails" and you get two layers stuck together?

    -NT

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