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  1. #1
    bessa_L_R3a's Avatar
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    steel reel question

    Hi,

    Can I use a leader retriever to slip out the leader in the light and load my steel reel in the light with a few inches of negative before hitting the changing bag? I just don't want to wrestle with the cheap clip.

    And how do I know if my negative is winding correctly without doubling up on the tracks? That is my biggest fear compared to using plastic reels ..

  2. #2

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    I would think that would work okay. Most cameras wind about 3-3.5" before exposing the first frame.

  3. #3
    bessa_L_R3a's Avatar
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    yeah!!! thanks ... and how do I avoid the double tracking? i'm terrified of developer not making contact with all surfaces.

  4. #4
    Kevin Caulfield's Avatar
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    Yeah, you have a few inches or so. You should be able to feel if it is winding correctly. If it isn't winding evenly you can feel that the back of the film is kinked slightly, not flat. It may be worth practising in day light and deliberately twisting it in the tracks to see and feel what incorrect winding looks and more importantly feels like.

  5. #5
    bessa_L_R3a's Avatar
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    anyone know where i can see you tube video or similar of winding 35mm on a steel reel? i couldn't find any on you tube

  6. #6
    tiberiustibz's Avatar
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    No amount of youtube videos can save you. learn by experience. If you're rolling in a dark bag give in.

    I started by not rolling the rolls into the canister all the way. I don't know that this helps you very much besides to confuse you as to which roll's you've shot (bad news bears).

    I pray for your sake that you're rolling in a dark closet, it's 50000000000000 times easier. I open the canister, cut the tab off, clip it in (in the dark, duh), and roll. To roll you have to make sure it is completely lined up, going straight in. Practice with scrap film. The tension must be even (pulling the same on both sides). Feel with your pointer finger on the hand that's holding the reel. Listen for the film crunching sound that it makes if you're screwing up. Remember how much space a roll takes up so that if you feel that your 36 exposure roll is only taking up half the reel you know there's something wrong. Keep the tension as low as possible and curve the film towards the emulsion so it slides into the track. Besides that find your youtube video or ask someone to show you.

  7. #7
    Christopher Walrath's Avatar
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    As to the clips, if you have the cheap steel wire bent around clips, take a micro pair of needle nose and bend them a little further around to allow the film to feed into the clip a little further. As to whether it's winding on correctly or not, about every half turn slide the film back and forth a wee bit. You should have about a quarter inch slack and should be able to feel it very easily. If the film is tight and doesn't slide at all, then go back, fix it and then continue. And TAKE YOUR TIME. If you're like me, loading film in a minute is abso-stinking-lutely out of the question. I take my time, about three to five minutes, unless I nail it. Haven't yet.
    Thank you.
    CWalrath
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    "Wubba, wubba, wubba. Bing, bang, bong. Yuck, yuck, yuck and a fiddle-dee-dee." - The Yeti

  8. #8
    Murray@uptowngallery's Avatar
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    Someone was just telling me about loading two rolls back to back in one spool. That takes confidence, experience, maybe both.

    Not sure why you'd want to...save time and a little chemistry?
    Murray

  9. #9

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    Sacrifice a cheap roll of film and practice, practice, practice. Before you know it, you'll be able to do it from scratch in the dark. If that doesn't work, consider a high quality reel like Hewes. These are almost foolproof because they are built to exacting standards and quality control. They are more expensive, but worth every penny.

  10. #10
    tiberiustibz's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Christopher Walrath View Post
    As to the clips, if you have the cheap steel wire bent around clips, take a micro pair of needle nose and bend them a little further around to allow the film to feed into the clip a little further. As to whether it's winding on correctly or not, about every half turn slide the film back and forth a wee bit. You should have about a quarter inch slack and should be able to feel it very easily. If the film is tight and doesn't slide at all, then go back, fix it and then continue. And TAKE YOUR TIME. If you're like me, loading film in a minute is abso-stinking-lutely out of the question. I take my time, about three to five minutes, unless I nail it. Haven't yet.
    I rolled 24 exposure rolls in 60 seconds each. Around 40 of them in my photo class. No stickies. Just keep it lined up with even pressure. That doesn't work in a dark bag mind you. After completing the photo class with no stickies I got home and rolled a color roll in an 11x17 dark bag and it was one giant sticky.

    Rolling back to back? you'd need 12 exposure rolls to fit on a 36 unless you're using the ilford 72 frame ones. The advantage being you can now fit 16 rolls of film in an 8 roll can.

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