Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 68,674   Posts: 1,481,865   Online: 1059
      
Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 21
  1. #11

    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Shooter
    4x5 Format
    Posts
    171
    why not process your own B&W film? it is very easy and pennies cheap

  2. #12

    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Pingree Grove, IL
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    34
    Images
    4
    Well im not so sure I like shooting film yet. Before April 1st I had never used a film camera that wasnt disposable in my 27 year lifetime. Before xmas 2006 I had never taken pictures that were not for an ebay add or for myspace and the like. I inherited a couple Petri SLRs at the end of March and shot a color roll through one and kind of liked it. Since then Ive bought a half dozen more rolls of B&W stuff not knowing it couldn't be processed in a 1hr joint, and traded a broken lens for an Elan 7E, since i shoot a canon DSLR.

    So now its been 9 days and I havent seen any results yet, If the next 3 or 4 rolls come out good and I like it as much or more than my DSLR, Ill look at processing my own. But its a pretty steep investment especially since i dont have a scanner or enlarger so I would need one or both of those to get prints unless dropping negs off at a lab for prints is fast and cost effective.

  3. #13

    Join Date
    May 2006
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    509
    Quote Originally Posted by randerson07 View Post
    This is promising, since I don't process my own, and may not for some time. Ive seen this stuff at the local Wal-Mart and Walgreen's but was afraid to pick it up. I may have to give it a try, Ive been waiting 9 days now to get back a roll of Tri-X back and it sucks. Dropping off before work and picking up after would be awesome.
    the b/w film is also a good test of your lab. If they can print it without a cast, chances are they're somewhat decent.

  4. #14

    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Shooter
    4x5 Format
    Posts
    171
    well i don't know if it's fair to judge traditional B&W using C-41 B&W films because those don't look at all like traditional B&W. B&W is an acquired taste with its long dynamic range, S-shaped contrast curves and smooth micro-powdered grain that cannot be acheived using digital, nor even on an inkjet in my opinion. for a sample of what B&W is like, you'll probably have to ask a friend to do it the traditional way, or better yet visit some B&W art galleries (not scanned work but traditional prints).

    processing B&W at groceries stores will give you black and white and... green. hehe.

  5. #15

    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Pingree Grove, IL
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    34
    Images
    4
    Well Im not getting it processed at grocery stores. I have 2 rolls out at a Wolf Camera, 1 notch above grocery store LOL. And I recently found a true camera shop 30 miles from my house that i have another roll at. I had a look around the shop and they have for sale all of the materials needed to process my own so ill be asking them about it when I pick up my prints. I also picked up a roll of the Ilford C41 B&W to have a go at. They had all kinds of fun stuff, medium format stuff, TLRs, lots and lots of choices on film, they can do E6(I think thats slide film right?), I spent alot of time just staring at stuff it was nice.

    This is turning out to be like every hobby ive ever had, "A dive in head first money pit"

  6. #16

    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Sydney, Australia
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    371
    Images
    15
    Quote Originally Posted by randerson07 View Post
    This is turning out to be like every hobby ive ever had, "A dive in head first money pit"
    One word ... Ebay

    There is a ton of useful stuff going for pennies on Ebay


    Graham.

  7. #17
    Contrastique's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Maastricht, The Netherlands
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    176
    Images
    68
    Quote Originally Posted by cotdt View Post
    Processing B&W at groceries stores will give you black and white and... green. hehe.
    Printing B&W at a colourlab, which one-hour services are, will give you green or magenta (depending on correction; to get the green out you have to add magenta and the other way around). I work with an Agfa lab and the paper used is colour and that's where the problem's at. It's impossible getting it absolutely neutral that way.

  8. #18

    Join Date
    May 2006
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    509
    Quote Originally Posted by Contrastique View Post
    Printing B&W at a colourlab, which one-hour services are, will give you green or magenta (depending on correction; to get the green out you have to add magenta and the other way around). I work with an Agfa lab and the paper used is colour and that's where the problem's at. It's impossible getting it absolutely neutral that way.

    Something is wrong in either your machine's set up, or your printing if you're unable to get a neutral b/w print. Getting a neutral print may be difficult at first, however it is far from impossible even on older optical printers.

  9. #19
    tac
    tac is offline

    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Appalachia
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    246
    I would also like to point out that because these films are based on using dyes, not silver, they are not going to last as long as traditional B/W materials - if that's important to your work.

  10. #20
    Contrastique's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Maastricht, The Netherlands
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    176
    Images
    68
    Quote Originally Posted by bob100684 View Post
    Something is wrong in either your machine's set up, or your printing if you're unable to get a neutral b/w print. Getting a neutral print may be difficult at first, however it is far from impossible even on older optical printers.
    I work with a Agfa D-lab 1. I'm not sure what your experience is on this field but with colourpaper you can't get a neutral b&w. It can come close, yes but not 100% b&w like with b&w paper. We worked hard in getting it as close as possible, like for example swopping paper to Kodak which is more white / neutral than the Agfa we used before. Now, when talking Epson 9800, a different story.

Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin