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  1. #1

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    This has probably been discussed ad-nauseum but after seeing Aggies Redwood Mushrooms picture (http://www.apug.org/site/main/album_page.php?pic_id=308) and the description of a very thin negative but lots of detail, I thought that it would be interesting to see what you all thought were the benefits of PMK over conventional developers. I currently only use Ilford ID11 but have been thinking of trying Pyro/PMK as a lot of people sing its praises.

    Phill

  2. #2
    David A. Goldfarb's Avatar
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    Read Gordon Hutchings' _Book of Pyro_ for all you ever wanted to know about PMK.

    For me the main benefit is better highlight detail.
    flickr--http://www.flickr.com/photos/davidagoldfarb/
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  3. #3
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    PMK is like cheating - Fine grain developers are solvent - eroding the grain for a softer effect. Sharpness is improved with a stronger grain structure. PMK enhances the grain and improves the sharpness but then fills in the gaps between grain with stain that prints as density. So you get your cake and you eat it too. Sharp grain without the grainy look. Also because it is a tanning developer - not allowing development to continue working on a highlight area after a certain point - gives you greater highlight separation and control - Kind of a win-win - Catechol also does all this with slightly less grain.
    Frank
    My photos are always without all that distracting color ...

  4. #4

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    Wow! A win-win situation. You don't see many of those these days.

    I suppose my next question then would be Does anyone have any experience with Pyro and FP4 plus which is my film of choice. I currently use 35mm(tank development) and 5x4(developed in BTZS tubes).

    I have checked the county library but "the book of pyro " doesn't seem to be high on their list, so I am off to SURF to see what I can find plus try and locate a pyro supplier in the UK

    Thanks for the quick responses

    Phill

    PS Frank - thanks for the postcard. I should have a set done next week

  5. #5
    Aggie's Avatar
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  6. #6

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    [quote="philldresser"]Wow! A win-win situation. You don't see many of those these days.

    I suppose my next question then would be Does anyone have any experience with Pyro and FP4 plus which is my film of choice. I currently use 35mm(tank development) and 5x4(developed in BTZS tubes).

    I have checked the county library but "the book of pyro " doesn't seem to be high on their list, so I am off to SURF to see what I can find plus try and locate a pyro supplier in the UK

    Thanks for the quick responses

    Phill

    PS Frank - thanks for the postcard. I should have a set done next week[/quote


    Phill,

    There is information regarding dilutions and developing time for Pyrocat HD and Ilford FP4 on Ed Buffaloes site www.unblinkingeye.com. This information is for both silver and for Pt-Pd. Please be aware, though, that the information posted there is based on using the BTZS principles for the SBR (scene brightness ratio). From what I understand, this relies on using an incident light meter in lieu of a spot meter or other reflective meter and then adding a factor of 5 to the spread between the low incident reading and the high incident reading. I mention this since I did not initially understand this and this gave me grossly overdeveloped negatives. FP4 is a film that many of the alternative process photographers use since it will build enough contrast (density) to use in those processes. Hope that this helps. Good luck.
    Art is a step from what is obvious and well-known toward what is arcane and concealed.

    Visit my website at http://www.donaldmillerphotography.com

  7. #7

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    Fellows, if you want information on FP4+ developed in Pyrocat-HD you need go no further. Item, stop at the next right light without going to the bank. Seriously, I wrote the book on this one since FP4+ has been my favorite film for years, both in roll film and sheet film, and of course I know a thing or two about Pyrocat-HD as well.

    Sandy King

  8. #8

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    Sandy

    Sounds good. Where or how can I be privvy to this well gotten information?

    Phill
    It is not tradition that secures the survival of our craft, its the craft that secures the survival of our traditions.

  9. #9
    roy
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    Phil,
    The "unblinking eye" website is a mine of information.
    Roy Groombridge.

    Cogito, ergo sum.
    (Descartes)

  10. #10

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    Phil,

    Let me know what kind of printing you will be doing with the FP4+ negatives in Pyrocat-HD and I will provide a recommended development time and dilution.

    By kind of printing I mean process (silver, Pt/Pd, salted paper, kallitype,etc.). And if silver gelatin let me know whether you are using VC, graded papers, or AZO, and of course what kind of enlarger set-up you have.


    Sandy King

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