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  1. #1

    Join Date
    Jul 2003
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    2
    Hi

    My 35 mm Iso 400 default film is Delta 400 and I use it between EI 200 and 800. I developed it in Perceptol, Xtol, ID11, DDX, Nucleol and Gradual.

    Lately I have seen I can find Neopan 400 at a more convenient price (-20%) than Delta.

    I couldn't find so many informations for Neopan as for Delta, so I'd like to know if someone already made a comparation of these 2 films or if there is any web site reporting about their differences.

    In particular, how they compare about grain, sharpness, shadow details @400 and tonal rendition with various developers ?

    I also found this article by G.Crawley
    http://www.bjphoto.co.uk/cms/materia..._films/1.shtml
    he found out slight diffrences between the most popular Iso 400 films.
    Do you agree with his conclusions ?

    I talked to a guy here, who switched from Neopan 400, despite of the convenience, because he found it had an inherently high contrast and he had to expose it @200 for having decent shadow details.
    What do U think about that ? Is he correct ?

    Any hint or trick by experts about Neopan 400 ?

    Thanx a lot in advance.

    Marco

  2. #2
    Eric Rose's Avatar
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    Nov 2002
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    I don't know much about Neopan but there are major differences between panchromatic and T-Grain films. Each has it's own "flavor" when printed. In my experience most pan films are pretty much the same within the same asa rating and most T-Grain films are pretty much the same again within the same asa rating. That is to say TMAX 400 is pretty close to Delta 400 when you stick it in the enlarger. If your friend was having problems with contrast there is probably something he is doing that he shouldn't.

    On another note, why do you use so many different developers? If I were you I would find one that you like and learn how to tease everything out of it with whatever film you finally decide to standardize on IMHO.

    Good luck and let us know how the Neopan works out.
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  3. #3

    Join Date
    Jul 2003
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    On another note, why do you use so many different developers? If I were you I would find one that you like and learn how to tease everything out of it with whatever film you finally decide to standardize on IMHO.
    I meant that I had the chance to try Delta in many soups and, even with differences dued to different developers, I always was satisfied of that film.
    Now I use almost exclusively Xtol.

  4. #4

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    I have found Neopan400 to be quite a bit slower than HP5+ in 35mm in PMK.

  5. #5

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    I'm sad to say that the neo 400 and 100 for my applications don't come close to the delta films. I had really high hopes for them because their neopan 1600 is a great film. The delta has a nicer range to it that also allows you to jump the blacks when you want to.



 

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