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  1. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by jim appleyard View Post
    I like to agitate once/minute. My mind can't handle it if I do it twice every 30 secs.

    Yogi Berra orders a pizza and the waitress aks if he would like it cut into 6 or 8 pieces. Yogi responds by saying "6, I don't think I could eat 8!"
    exactly!

    it is hard enough remembering 10seconds every minute.

    john

  2. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by dancqu View Post
    ...The more dilute the
    chemistry the longer can be those intervals...
    I guess longer development times can be more comfortable generally, but what happens if the room temperature is high? Wouldn't 30 degrees C be a problem for say 15 minutes development time or more? Some places can get very hot in the summer, even in the night. Maintaining a reasonable temperature in the tank must be tricky.

  3. #13
    rwyoung's Avatar
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    You can make a water bath to rest your tank between agitations. The sink or even just a large tub or photo tray of water can help. Plastic tanks are a little harder to heat and cool quickly as the transfer coefficient is lower than for a stainless steel tank.

    Don't make your bath so deep it can submerge the tank though.

    If your tap water is too warm for the bath, add some ice. Either directly or by putting the ice in a plastic bag you can add and remove as needed. Or get a re-freezable ice pack or two. And keep your eye on the water bath temp with a thermometer. You can raise the temp with hot water or a simple fishtank heater but it can be a bit slow.

    There are also commercial units to do exactly this but a sink or plastic dish tub works great.
    Don't sweat the petty things and don't pet the sweaty things! http://rwyoung.wordpress.com

  4. #14

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    Another option in high temperatures is to use a "tropical" developer. This is a developer that's formulated for use in high temperatures. IIRC, Anchell's Darkroom Cookbook has some information on them, including descriptions of what to add to a commercial developer to turn it into a tropical one. (I might be mistaken about the latter, though, and my copy's not handy to check.)

  5. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by Anon Ymous View Post
    I guess longer development times can be more comfortable generally, but what happens if the room temperature is high? Wouldn't 30 degrees C be a problem for say 15 minutes development time or more? Some places can get very hot in the summer, even in the night. Maintaining a reasonable temperature in the tank must be tricky.
    As long as the dev is the right temp(say 20C) going in to the tank, I'd be surprised if standing it in a room at 30C even for 15 mins alters the temp much but this is an assumption on my part. Try plain water at 20C in a room which is say 10C warmer for 15 mins and then check temp say every 5 mins to see the effect. If temp changes quite quickly and substantially as opposed to a small change slowly, say 1C taking effect after say 12 mins then try a correct temp water bath for the tank. That will certainly nail the temp down to the correct dev temp even in a very hot room.

    pentaxuser

  6. #16

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    [QUOTE=rwyoung;627056]
    If your tap water is too warm for the bath, add some ice. Either directly or by putting the ice in a plastic bag you can add and remove as needed. Or get a re-freezable ice pack or two. QUOTE]


    Good ideas. I like to keep a handful of the plastic canisters that film comes in frozen so I can pop them in the too-warm dev. That way they cool of the dev w/o diluting it.

  7. #17

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    I agree 100% . For years I went from film to film, developer to developer and wondered why the results were never the same. Stick with one film and developer combo until you truly understand the tolerances. I agitate mildly for 10 seconds every minute using a twisting motion. Just be consistent and you'll be fine. Use the same technique at all times and you'll soon be on your way to reliable and predictable results.

    Quote Originally Posted by srs5694 View Post
    I'd like to second Dave's recommendation: Be consistent. In fact, when starting out, it's best to pick one developer, along with one or two films, and use only those products for a while. Delta 100 and Tri-X 400 are fine for this purpose, but don't start adding new films until you're comfortable with these two. Rodinal is not usually considered an optimal developer for fast films (such as Tri-X), but in my limited experience with such combinations, it's not so bad as to be unusable. (Rodinal produces bigger grain than many other developers, so a fast film in Rodinal may produce objectionably big grain, particularly with 35mm or smaller film.) If you decide to switch from the Rodinal, do it now. Note that Rodinal lasts a long time on the shelf, so you should be able to come back to it in a few months with no loss of quality.

    Personally, I use one agitation method: 5s every 30s. I use this with every film and developer I use, without deviation. The reason is that I don't want to use custom agitation methods for each film and then get confused and use the wrong one at some point. I adjust my development time to suit the film using this method.

    Of course, others like to experiment with agitation style or customize it for particular films, but as a beginner, it's best to stick to one method and, if necessary, adjust the development time to get the right density. If you play with other variables, it'll be harder to figure out what's going on when you get results you don't (or do) like.

  8. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by Anon Ymous View Post
    I guess longer development times can be more
    comfortable generally, but what happens if the
    room temperature is high?
    I maintain a well tempered impatientness and/or
    keep, while not agitating, the metal tank in water.
    Often I track the in and out temperature of the
    developer. Start with the temperature a little
    low, use as much solution volume as possible,
    and keep those 98.6 fahrenheit hands away
    save for when needed. Dan

  9. #19
    Paul Cocklin's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jim appleyard View Post
    Yogi Berra orders a pizza and the waitress aks if he would like it cut into 6 or 8 pieces. Yogi responds by saying "6, I don't think I could eat 8!"
    Jim, Yogi doesn't eat there anymore. No one does...it's too crowded.

    I wholeheartedly support sticking with one developer/film/paper combination until you learn what each does with each other. Then, when you want to experiment and change, change only 1 at a time, that way you can tell what's doing what.

  10. #20

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    [QUOTE=Paul Cocklin;627727]Jim, Yogi doesn't eat there anymore. No one does...it's too crowded.QUOTE]

    Yes! I had forgotten about that one.

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