Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 69,933   Posts: 1,522,244   Online: 1060
      
Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 123
Results 21 to 29 of 29
  1. #21
    John Bragg's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Penwithick, Cornwall, U.K.
    Shooter
    35mm RF
    Posts
    334
    Images
    9
    I would say use an orange filter to minimise them and perhaps a green to enhance them ????

  2. #22
    df cardwell's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Dearborn,Michigan & Cape Breton Island
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    3,342
    Images
    8
    Quote Originally Posted by John Bragg View Post
    I would say use an orange filter to minimise them and perhaps a green to enhance them ????
    You bet. Now, say the sitter has blue eyes.

    How do you make the freckles dark, and make the eyes light ?

    Hint: remember the context of the thread !

  3. #23
    2F/2F's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Los Angeles, CA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    8,008
    Images
    4
    No filters, ortho film would do it. Especially on an overcast day. Or if you need something faster, a blue or cyan filter on a panchromatic film.

    But I think dark freckles and light eyes would be pretty hideous, myself.
    Last edited by 2F/2F; 05-17-2008 at 08:14 AM. Click to view previous post history.
    2F/2F

    "Truth and love are my law and worship. Form and conscience are my manifestation and guide. Nature and peace are my shelter and companions. Order is my attitude. Beauty and perfection are my attack."

    - Rob Tyner (1944 - 1991)

  4. #24
    Michel Hardy-Vallée's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Montréal (QC)
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    4,351
    Images
    132
    Quote Originally Posted by df cardwell View Post
    A cool experiment is to photograph freckles. I think this is cool because my WIFE has freckles !

    So. Say you want to show them fairly neutrally. How do you do it ?
    OR, the sitter is shy about the freckles. How do you minimize them ?
    OR, the sitter is aggressively proud of the freckles. How do you show them off.

    Let's say the sittings are all under an overcast sky, with no direct sun.

    How many ways are there ?

    Who wants to play ??
    Filters!

    A blue filter will show them aggressively, a red one will diminish them. Depending on the film, no filter will show them relatively neutral.
    Using film since before it was hip.


    "One of the most singular characters of the hyposulphites, is the property their solutions possess of dissolving muriate of silver and retaining it in considerable quantity in permanent solution" — Sir John Frederick William Herschel, "On the Hyposulphurous Acid and its Compounds." The Edinburgh Philosophical Journal, Vol. 1 (8 Jan. 1819): 8-29. p. 11

    My APUG Portfolio

  5. #25
    df cardwell's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Dearborn,Michigan & Cape Breton Island
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    3,342
    Images
    8

    The magic spectrogram

    Depending on the film, no filter will show them relatively neutral.

    Yep. Films all see color differently. By this, I mean that if we idealize some 'perfect neutral film', all the rest have some sort of built in filter. Not flaws, it's how they were designed.

    TriX passes for neutral. Some are more sensitive to red, some less. Our choices today are paltry compared to the '50s, but we can make the most of our choices if we take a look at the spectrogram most film makers publish on their poop sheet. We don't need to do a critical analysis of the chart, just get a hint at what the film might do, then go give a test drive.

    A few rolls of TriX and a color chart are all you need to begin. See how the colors are different in daylight and under tungsten lights, with their built in orange filter. Contact print them.

    Then check Pan F, or Acros. And if you have a Wayback Machine, some APX 100. Get to know the spectro shape that you like, and screen films that look promising.

    Warning: Kodak, Ilford, and Fuji use different proportions for their charts - reshape them before you starting drawing curves. (Not that I've ever made THAT mistake before !)

    Below, see 3 films overlaid on a TriX color graph.

    For a Portraitist, APX 100 will darken red, AND lighten blue (Relative to TriX). Pan F lightens red and darkens blue. Kinda handy outdoors, eh ?

    .
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails B&W spectrum comp.jpg  

  6. #26

    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,054
    I take a different approach, I use gender to pick my film, well mostly. If doing a male portrait, I like to use a slow, fine-grain to catch every detail in the face. Pan-F or Efke 25 or 50 come to mind; if there is enough light to do this. A 100 speed film would be a good second choice. Rodinal would be a good gev to use as it gives good sharpness. Generally, I'm after a gritty, in-your-face (pun intended!) look.

    For women, I would go to a 400 speed film to give a softer look that will help hide facial imperfections. I would then go to something like D-76 1+0 to soften even more. A softening filter may help as well.

    Now, suppose I'm doing a portrait of "The Sea Hag" from "Popeye", for this I may switch and go to my slow film in an accutance dev to catch all the ugliness. It's all about what you want to achieve!

    I did a portrait of a female friend with Ilford's SFX, 35mm with the IR filter. She loved it, but hates having her portrait taken; she says she's not beautiful, but of course she is! This film is very grainy, but that added to it by giving a soft look.

    If possible, shoot 2 or more types of film and see which you like best.

  7. #27
    Ian Grant's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    West Midlands, UK, and Turkey
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    16,199
    Images
    148
    Jim in a different but also current thread Mike Seb mentions EFKE/Adox 25. It's quite a different film to Pan-F with it's ortho-panchromatic look.

    I used it many years ago for a long photo-shoot, probably shooting about 15 rolls of 35mm, alongside MF FP4 and E6. The skin tones are superb, and as Mike says have that 30's Hollywood look usually associated with a 10x8 and very flattering lighting. The only reason I didn't continue using it was it's speed made it less practical than FP-4.

    Ian

  8. #28

    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,054
    Quote Originally Posted by Ian Grant View Post
    Jim in a different but also current thread Mike Seb mentions EFKE/Adox 25. It's quite a different film to Pan-F with it's ortho-panchromatic look.

    I used it many years ago for a long photo-shoot, probably shooting about 15 rolls of 35mm, alongside MF FP4 and E6. The skin tones are superb, and as Mike says have that 30's Hollywood look usually associated with a 10x8 and very flattering lighting. The only reason I didn't continue using it was it's speed made it less practical than FP-4.

    Ian
    Oh yes indeed, two different critters. I only used Pan-F with the Efke's as a guide to slow, fine-grained films that could show lots of detail in a face. But as you say, SLOW!

  9. #29
    df cardwell's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Dearborn,Michigan & Cape Breton Island
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    3,342
    Images
    8
    JIM & IAN

    Great stuff guys.

Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 123


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin