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  1. #11
    Ian Grant's Avatar
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    You might look at a similar current thread about Benzotriazole and Potassium Bromide as restrainers, leave out any Benzotriazole and the PQ version is warmer..

    It's also worth bearing in mind that Agfa used to sell Neutol WA as a powder and as a liquid. The powdered version was an MQ developer, while the liquid version is PQ based and gives slightly warmer results.

    The reason your Perceptol negatives look warmer toned is they are finer grained, the whole basis of warm-tone development is to achieve finer grain in the prints.

    Interestingly Perceptol uses NaCl as a silver solvent, Ilford published a Technical data sheet P10 in 1965 discussing Fine Grain film developers, and in this suggest modifying ID-11 or ID-2 for even finer grain by adding Ammonium Chloride to 40g/litre working solution.

    So it would be interesting to try a warm-tone developer formula using Ammonium or Sodium Chloride in place of the KBr. Remember you need very much higher levels of the chloride.

    Ian

  2. #12
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    Liquidol from the Formulary, developed (pun) by myself and Bill Troop is essentially a "syrup" of Dektol, but with longer life and capacity. It is used 1:9.

    PE

  3. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by el wacho View Post
    I want to mix a syrup version of d-52
    ( kodak warm tone developer ) in the
    order of 10x - ...
    On a ratio basis D52 differs from D72 only
    in the amount of carbonate. Essentially it
    is a low carbonate D72.

    Compare it with Ansco 120; no hydroquinone.
    Add Beer's 7 to your list of concentrates and twixt
    the two you've a contrast control blend similar to
    A. Adams two part Ansco 130. Dan

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