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  1. #1
    sun of sand's Avatar
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    Chloroform/TriChlor for film cleaning

    Scant stuff on the net besides it being the best solvent before being essentially banned so was wondering about its film cleaning properties abilities. It was used more for motion picture, I guess ...much use for our still negatives or overkill? What is it supposed to clean exactly? Oil/fingerprints/Dust? Would it "ruin" the still negative for printing in any way? Is a microfiber/brush/Dust Off better or safer?
    Anyone have a procedure besides dabbing a cloth in it and goin' to town? Just bathe -the film- in it?


    Anything?

  2. #2

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    I can just imagine the phone call to the chemical supplier...

    "Yes, I'd like some ether, chloroform, collodion, and potassium cyanide please. Oh, excuse me, there's some guys in suits at the door."

  3. #3
    sun of sand's Avatar
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    That reminds me of a story during the bird flu craze a few years ago
    Dude was sick/not feeling good etc whatever so took the day off from work
    Boss called up and dude said he was sick ..Got this bird flu sh*t
    Boss calls authorites and team shows up at his door sportin' their official gear and they ring the bell a few times with no answer
    Team of suits break through the door to find dude sittin' down in Pj's watching Price is Right about to sh*t a brick
    Team questions dude why the f*ck he didn't answer the door
    That doorbell broke years ago

    I doubt that story is true but it's hilarious to act out


    How would one go about making cyanide from cherries?

  4. #4
    Ross Chambers's Avatar
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    My time in film cutting rooms commenced after trichloroethylene had been stopped, as I understand it following action by the British unions. We used Freon, which was not particularly safer, certainly dodgy for the environment (but we didn't appear to have one of those at that time!!)

    For what's it's worth the technique was to conservatively dampen a velvet cloth with Freon (real cotton velvet BTW, not synthetic, to avoid static) and wrap it around a section of the roll of the film, usually holding the sandwich against the horizontal bench surface, and then wind the film from reel to reel at a moderate speed, aiming to have the film surface dry before it met the roll on the take-up spool. It was advisable to swap the section of the velvet in contact with the film every 100-200 feet to avoid the possibility of accumulated grunge being redeposited on the film.

    Motion picture labs used an ultrasonic bath to greater and lesser effect, but I'm not sure what fluid was used, I'd imagine that it's still used, there are lots of motion pics shot on film still.

    Regards - Ross

  5. #5

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    1:1:1 Trichlor has been banned for some time now by International Treaty for film cleaning and Perchloroethylene has replaced it (at least in some parts of the USA), but that appears to be on the way out as well. The reason for banning is that it is a ozone depleting chemical and for its' toxicity.

    Perc (for short), better known as dry-cleaning fluid and used in motion picture wet gate printing operations for base scratch abatement, has been pressed into service as the next active solvent for motion picture cleaning, but we found it less effective than Trichlor as it has a higher volatilization point.

    You probably shouldn't use this at home even if you can find it, as you need Perc resistant gloves, an organic vapor cartridge air mask and protective eye wear, as well as an semi-annual blood test to screen for blood disorders and cancer.

    The thing about Perc, and even more so Trichor, is its amazing de-fatting capabilities; dip your finger in it and it will turn white instantly as the liquid evaporates, as all the fat from the first few layers of skin are instantly removed. The liquid also instantly goes into your blood stream and you can pass out from over exposure in about 10 minutes of use in a improperly ventilated room.

    If you have to use it, and I would advise you don't, do so outside and very sparingly.

  6. #6

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    Hey there

    please do not use chloroform or trichlor ,perchlor etc it is a fantastic cleaner but at the same time toxic ,it is a drug , you will feel as after drunking a lot of beer and as already mentioned forbidden ,use distilled or demineralised water wit a drop of surfactant (last rincing bath stuff) and let dry on the air

    jm

  7. #7

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    I use a soft, lint-free cloth wound around my finger with lighter fluid applied to the end. It seems to wipe off finger prints and just about anything else. I keep a bottle of lighter fluid next to my enlargers for just that purpose.
    Rick Jason.
    "I'm still developing"

  8. #8
    sun of sand's Avatar
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    Ok thanks very much guys. Environmental concerns are valid but we don't care about the environment
    I'm glad everyone cares for my safety but after reading the OSHA I'm much less scared than I was after reading Kinos post
    haha Instant Death

  9. #9

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    Chloroform, like most other chlorinated hydrocarbons, is a great degreaser. Unfortunately, it is a rather nasty chemical. It is a listed carcinogen, although a rather mild one, an inhalation hazard, and a very nasty skin irritant.

  10. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by sun of sand View Post
    Ok thanks very much guys. Environmental concerns are valid but we don't care about the environment
    I'm glad everyone cares for my safety but after reading the OSHA I'm much less scared than I was after reading Kinos post
    haha Instant Death
    Have at it buddy; it's your funeral, but make sure you don't poison anyone else or the environment around you.

    We used hundreds of gallons of the stuff in a year, but we did so RESPONSIBLY, with personal protection and Hazmat support for the waste stream.

    You should reap the fruits of your actions, but have the balls to not press it upon someone else who has no choice.
    Last edited by Kino; 05-30-2008 at 10:50 AM. Click to view previous post history.

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