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  1. #11

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    Here is a Fujifilm data sheet: http://www.fujifilm.fr/support/pdf/f...anAcros100.pdf

    According to it the F16 @ 1/250 is "Seashore or snow scenes in bright sunlight." The typical bright sun exposure is listed as f11@1/250 or f16@1/125.

    Fred

  2. #12

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    Here in sunny Florida...

    ...I have found it about a 1/3rd to a 1/2 stop more light that the rule gives, mostly the latter. That's hard shadow, bright sun, April.

    I remember when in lived in southern CA, it would be easy to be fooled by the Sunny Sixteen rule. Often whole days would have soft shadows due to the scattering of marine haze, yet to non photographers appear bright and sunny. One could still get sunburned, but the light level was about a 1/2 stop less than "the rule." No, it wasn't smog!

    Now for another twist. I spent most of my life living in Colorado. A lot more UV. Would that effect film speed? Would it effect tonality, the high blue and UV perhaps causing a lightening effect? Distant scenes at mountain altitudes in color, including digital, are very blue. I bought a UV cutoff filter from B&H, $24 for a 49mm which helped a lot.

  3. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by pentaxuser View Post

    Fuji has given users the sunny f16 rule on the side of the box but it puzzled me a lot. I always thought that the rule was that in bright sunlight, exposure was the reciprocal of the ISO speed so for Acros that makes it 1/100th second at f16.

    However Fuji gives a constant exposure of 1/250th, varying the aperture for different light conditions. So bright sunshine is f16 for seashore and snow, f11for "ordinary" bright sunshine; f8 for hazy sunshine and f5.6 for cloudy bright.

    A 1/250th is, I think, one and a half stops less than I would have expected.
    Exposure is a combination of F/stop and shutter speed. If you change the shutter speed one way you change the F/stop the other way.

    Should they have said 1/200 instead of 1/250? It's been mentioned but this days most cameras don't have 1/200 on the shutter. The difference isn't huge and the shutter is likely running slow

    By using 1/250 instead of 1/100 they made it easier to handhold. Plus why ask a 35mm user to use F/22 or f/16 more often then needed?

  4. #14
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    There are better things to do in Cornwall than read film data sheets....!

    Sunny 16 rule is a function of film speed and simply works. There must be a printing mistake. EI80 is right for this film, poss even EI64, using 100 is optimistic, 250 is plain wrong! I wouldn't expect shadows here on South Coast to be too dissimilar and indeed have used at EI80 in the Lake District.

    Off to Cornwall again tomorrow - sans film data sheets!

  5. #15
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    The package is correct.

    The sunny 16 rule is more formally known as Basic Daylight Exposure (BDE) exactly to avoid this sort of misunderstanding. It is just a starting point for guessing exposure. It doesn't mean you have to shoot at f/16. The f/11 on the package is actually BDE, not f/16. This is because BDE states, on a bright, clear day, when film speed equals shutter speed, use f/16. This is based on the assumption that there is an ambient light level that would give you an EV of 14-2/3. Thus BDE would give you an exposure of '100 at f/16, equivalent to '200 at f/11. Fuji figure that anyone who is basing their exposures off of the chart on the box will not have a camera that can shoot at '200. Most cameras have '250, however, so they list BDE as '250 at f/11. The seashore/snow/etc setting is usually one f stop higher than BDE, hence the listing of '250 at f/16. It is also possible that Fuji has decided that a nice round EV 15 is more correct for BDE, which would make '250 and f/11 line up perfectly according to the rule. Also, remember that clear and bright means clear and bright. May places rarely experience these conditions. Here in L.A., CA, I almost always open one f stop from BDE on a day that is bright but not clear.

    The package is correct.
    Last edited by 2F/2F; 05-23-2008 at 01:50 AM. Click to view previous post history.
    2F/2F

    "Truth and love are my law and worship. Form and conscience are my manifestation and guide. Nature and peace are my shelter and companions. Order is my attitude. Beauty and perfection are my attack."

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  6. #16

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    I've never used Acros (although a roll has been lingering in my fridge for a year or more) so can't comment with reference to that film type. However, I've always regarded the Sunny 16 rule as pretty optimistic for use in the UK as our idea of bright sunshine would probably be a dull day to someone from sunnier climes (ie pretty much anywhere else on the planet). Except for incredibly bright sunshine on snow or sand, I regard Sunny 11 as far more realistic in the UK, although where I live perhaps the Overcast 2.8 rule is more useful!

    Best wishes,
    Steve

  7. #17

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    Reviewing photos I took a few weeks ago in the mountains above tree line, the range of exposures was 1/1500 to 1/750 at f8, EI 100 (not Acros) with most at 1/1000 f8. It was a clear day, very sunny and primarily of snow. It was so bright that even good quality sunglasses were just barely adequate. I could only remove my sunglasses for a few seconds at a time

    In this case, the scene fit the description of the top box on the chart. The light levels were much higher than I normally encounter, possibly as a result of the clear, dry air at altitude. But, probably more important, the subject matter was snow, as is stated on the chart. For me, that level on the chart is exceptional and not that often encountered. If it hurts to look at without sunglasses, it is probably one of those scenes.

    The same light levels in a scene without the snow would be in the next box down on the chart.


    Martin

  8. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by Fred Aspen View Post
    According to it the F16 @ 1/250 is "Seashore or snow scenes in bright sunlight." The typical bright sun exposure is listed as f11@1/250 or f16@1/125.
    And since "sunny 16" was not based on seashore/snow scenes, I'd have to say the data sheet gives good info.

  9. #19

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    It can be dangerous to draw conclusions from low numbers -statistically speaking - and I guess we'd need several hundred APUGers replying from different latitudes before forming any firm conclusions. However I think it's the case that everyone is right based on his own experience. It is difficult for any film company to give a perfect rule for exposure for all customers from latitude 0 to, say, latitude 70 as well as allowing for light clarity differences even at the same latitude.

    I had simply thought that if Fuji were to look at its major customer areas it might have concluded that f11 at 1/250th was a trifle optimistic but it's clear that many in the U.S. and possibly southern Europe from at least the late Spring to mid Autumn would find that 1/200th -1/250th is right and indeed it appears that the meter would indicate such an exposure.

    I think there have been only two replies from the U.K. but both from latitudes where I had taken pictures and these replies seem to indicate that F11 at 1/125th for bright sunshine in non snow or sand scenes is closer to the correct exposure and certainly accords with my gut instinct. The use of an EI of 80 or 64 would, I think, make 1/250th a complete non starter in the U.K. and probably most other places in the world.

    As I said, it would be interesting to see what Ilford, at about latitude 53/54, say about their ISO100 film, Delta 100, in terms of the sunny f16/f11 rule. I must try and find out

    Moose10101 - I couldn't check my reading today. It wasn't even cloudy bright let alone bright sunshine! That's one of the problems with ISO100 film in the U.K even in summer. We get all four seasons in the same afternoon and with MF or 35mm zooms and the need for plenty DoF, there could be handholding exposure problems in all but the best light conditions.

    Fuji should maybe add on its boxes for the U.K. "avoid using except in high summer" High summer of course is always 2 hours on one afternoon anywhere from June to mid September but no-one knows the date in advance!

    I've enjoyed everybody's contribution. Thanks again

    pentaxuser

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