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  1. #1
    bessa_L_R3a's Avatar
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    Interested in powder chems ..

    Hi,

    Is there such thing as powder developer and powder fixer? I want to be able to travel with all my negative processing equipment and powder would be much easier, but if fixer can't be obtained in powder form then I might as well keep on using HC 110 ...

  2. #2
    David Brown's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bessa_L_R3a View Post
    Is there such thing as powder developer and powder fixer? ...
    Yes. Both D-76 and ID-11 are powders, as is Microdol. (and likely others)

    Kodak "fixer" is powder.
    David
    Taking pictures is easy. Making photographs is hard.

    http://www.behance.net/silverdarkroom

  3. #3
    MattKing's Avatar
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    One thing to remember though is that the powders don't remain homogenous in the package. The component parts tend to be unevenly distributed through the package.

    This means that you cannot reliably mix up just a portion of the powder. You should mix up a whole package at a time.

    The mixing instructions also tend to require hotter water to mix, and then a cool-down before use.

    If you foresee that your travels will include long stops in various places, it may make sense to take powdered chemistry, and develop in batches. If, however you are hoping to develop small amounts of film on a daily or quite frequent basis in lots of different locations, liquid chemistry may make more sense.

    Hope this helps.

    Matt

  4. #4

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    Just be wary of traveling by air with white power (most dry photo chemistry is), in your luggage. If flying I'd probably only try to fly with chems in unopened manufacturer's packaging, and put it in a checked bag rather than carry it on. David's suggestions are great, to be on the safe side, I might even stick with Kodak (being readily reconisable brand name for baggage screeners). HCA is ussually dry (at least kodak's), the only chemical I'm not sure I've ever seen dry is stop bath, but you can always just use a water rinse, or use diluted white vinigar which you could get just about anywhere when you get to your location.

    Peter

  5. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by pwitkop View Post
    I've ever seen dry is stop bath
    Peter
    You could use citric acid.

  6. #6
    Jim Noel's Avatar
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    "One thing to remember though is that the powders don't remain homogenous in the package. The component parts tend to be unevenly distributed through the package.

    This means that you cannot reliably mix up just a portion of the powder. You should mix up a whole package at a time."

    For over 25 years I have mixed chemistry from the package by the spoonful with no problems. I mix at the desired dilution and at room temperature. If traveling with powdered chemicals I just invert the package several times to be sure there is little if any settlement.
    At home I don't even bother with this. I have used D-6, Dektol, LPD, Selectol, Selectol Soft and Kodak fixer among others.
    [FONT=Comic Sans MS]Films NOT Dead - Just getting fixed![/FONT]

  7. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by bessa_L_R3a View Post
    Hi,
    Is there such thing as powder developer and powder fixer?
    No problem. For film and even paper only three chemicals
    are needed. For the developer carry a bottle of metol and
    a bottle of sodium sulfite. For the film and paper fixer
    carry a bottle of sodium thiosulfate.

    The developer is D-23 and can be used very dilute
    one-shot. Slow with paper but does make good
    prints. The fixer can also be used very dilute
    one-shot.

    So, three bottles of powder chemicals. Dan

  8. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by yellowcat View Post
    You could use citric acid.
    Or you can use sodium acetate. But a plain water rinse works fine.
    Tom Hoskinson
    ______________________________

    Everything is analog - even digital :D

  9. #9

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    If I remember correctly, Kodak marketed an indicator stop bath years ago in powder form. Was that not sodium acetate, which, when mixed with water yielded acetic acid?
    Frank Schifano

  10. #10
    Ian Grant's Avatar
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    My suggestion is take a different route when travelling. I'd rather carry a small bottle of a liquid developer like Rodinal, and a small bottle of Fixer like Hypam. It saves a lot of bother making up powdered chemicals away from the darkroom, weighs only a little more, once made up you still have to store the powdered dev which rather defeats the whole object of carrying less weight etc. This is what I do when camping, although I now take Pyrocat HD.

    Ian

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