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  1. #11
    bowzart's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by miklosphoto View Post
    Thank you guys for the answers.
    Now, can I use the No Scratch with a scanner too? Nikon Coolscan 5000, I wonder if the liquid would damage the scanner?
    I don't know whether the Nikon scanners have provision for using scanning fluid, but if they do, that would be the way to go, because it does, I understand, give a better scan, especially with Black and White. It is available for my Epson v750, which is a flatbed, not strictly a film scanner.

    But, why bother with it, unless you have need of using fluid for some reason other than the scratches? From what I saw in what you showed, it doesn't seem worth any kind of trouble. It wouldn't be hard at all to remove the scratches from the scans - at least that is what it looks like to me. Or have I got it wrong?

    Anyway, I don't think we are really talking about any real kind of liquid; it's just a thin coat of oil. Won't drip. I doubt it would hurt, but don't take my word for it. Haven't done it, so don't know.

  2. #12
    Jon Shiu's Avatar
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    Hi, No-Scratch is like turpentine, so I wouldn't put it in the scanner in fear of making a mess!

    Jon
    Mendocino Coast Black and White Photography: www.jonshiu.com

  3. #13

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    It would seem likely the scratches are caused by the neg sleeves. I'm wondering if it makes a difference whether you are using a fixer with hardener or not. Does a fix with hardener make it less likely to get scratches such as this? I'd like to hear from someone with technical knowledge.

  4. #14
    bowzart's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by goldie View Post
    It would seem likely the scratches are caused by the neg sleeves. I'm wondering if it makes a difference whether you are using a fixer with hardener or not. Does a fix with hardener make it less likely to get scratches such as this? I'd like to hear from someone with technical knowledge.
    I've copied a portion of the image you supplied and increased the contrast substantially so the scratches are easier to see; attached. Now that I see them better, I have to say that it seems extremely unlikely that they are from the negative sleeves. It is far more likely that they result from microscopic particles on your pressure plate in the camera. They are very straight, parallel lines. If caused by the sleeves, they would not have such a regular appearance; they would be more random.

    If this is true, hardener won't help, because the scratches will be there prior to processing. Hardener can help if the scratches occur after the film is processed.

    Your pressure plate may appear to be clean, but I suspect that it is not. These problems can often be extremely hard to isolate.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails scratches.jpg  

  5. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by miklosphoto View Post
    Hi there,
    anyone who could give me a useful advise here, appreciated.
    I am developing my own B&W film, one roll at a time. Everything is under full control. As soon as the film is dried I cut it in 6 (35mm film) and insert them into the plastic sleeves (Print File Archival Storage Page for Negatives, 35mm, 6-Strips of 6-Frames). The next day I pull then out and scan on Nikon Coolscan.
    I see a lot of tiny hair scratches, not the thick long scratches what you'd get improper handling, but really tiny once.
    I attached an example.
    Any suggestion how to avoid these?
    thanks for any help.
    Miklos
    You may be winding or unwinding your film too tight.

    Mark Watsopn

  6. #16
    Joe VanCleave's Avatar
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    Perhaps. But if he's using the type of 35mm sleeve that loads on the sides, where the negs have to be slid in their full length, with very little slack, then yes, these could be the cause. Especially if there's some sand, dust or other grit in his immediate environment that gets on the negs or sleeves prior to being used, such as can be caused by static electricity in a dry environment, or just a dusty interior.

    There are the kind of sleeves that top load; these could be a better choice in such an environment.

    My personal film processing is also fraught with the constant battle of dust. I have a bathroom, tile only, not carpet, within which I remove all towels, do a thorough vacuuming, then run a humidifier, while the film is in the final rinse. Then I hang the negs from a dedicated shower curtain hung in the shower, close the door, and place a sign indicating do not open upon penalty of ... well, you get the idea. It's something one has to constantly fight.

    FYI, I work in a large semiconductor cleanroom, and am used to a pristine work environment. Which is one reason why my garage-based darkroom frustrates me so, having to trudge through a dusty garage to get to the darkroom, and also why I don't do the final rinse and dry in there, but rather the clean, humidified bathroom.

    ~Joe

  7. #17

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    Do you have your thumb on the pressure plate area when rewinding you film into cassette?

  8. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by bowzart View Post
    They can result from handling on the light table, or perhaps even from passing fruitflies racing to catch a banana.
    And remember, time flies like an arrow but fruit flies like a banana.

    Another vote for nose oil.
    Don't sweat the petty things and don't pet the sweaty things! http://rwyoung.wordpress.com

  9. #19
    Saganich's Avatar
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    Scratches from pressure plates in cameras are not consistent between rolls but are within on roll of film. Check carefully a roll that is scratched and if you should see similar scratch patterns on multiple areas of the same roll of film you know it is the camera. Making your conclusion based on one no-scratch observation is meaningless.
    Chris Saganich
    http://www.imagebrooklyn.com

  10. #20
    bowzart's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by rwyoung View Post
    And remember, time flies like an arrow but fruit flies like a banana.

    Another vote for nose oil.
    I thought that time flies like an eagle. Better check.

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