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  1. #1
    miklosphoto's Avatar
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    scratches on the negatives

    Hi there,
    anyone who could give me a useful advise here, appreciated.
    I am developing my own B&W film, one roll at a time. Everything is under full control. As soon as the film is dried I cut it in 6 (35mm film) and insert them into the plastic sleeves (Print File Archival Storage Page for Negatives, 35mm, 6-Strips of 6-Frames). The next day I pull then out and scan on Nikon Coolscan.
    I see a lot of tiny hair scratches, not the thick long scratches what you'd get improper handling, but really tiny once.
    I attached an example.
    Any suggestion how to avoid these?
    thanks for any help.
    Miklos
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails 0805N_Roll_06_19_3-3.jpg  

  2. #2

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    I had a very similar problem with a Kiev 60. There would be long hairline scratches on most rolls. Eventually I determined there were microscopic particles of grit stuck to the metal rollers in the camera. On top of that the rollers were not turning freely. By fixing those two issues I've had no more trouble. Something to consider when troubleshooting your problem.

  3. #3
    miklosphoto's Avatar
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    I have eliminated that possibility already. If scanning straight after the film is dry, it is perfectly clean.
    Thanks for the idea.
    Miklos

  4. #4
    Jon Shiu's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by miklosphoto View Post
    I have eliminated that possibility already. If scanning straight after the film is dry, it is perfectly clean.
    Thanks for the idea.
    Miklos
    Hi, must be scratching by the sleeves, then. Would look for sleeves that are not quite as tight or some other way to store/protect them.

    Jon
    Mendocino Coast Black and White Photography: www.jonshiu.com

  5. #5
    bobwysiwyg's Avatar
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    As soon as the film is dried I cut it in 6 (35mm film) and insert them into the plastic sleeves (Print File Archival Storage Page for Negatives, 35mm, 6-Strips of 6-Frames). The next day I pull then out and scan on Nikon Coolscan.
    Might be worth closely examining the archival sleeves. Rough edges could do this while inserting and removing the strips.
    WYSIWYG - At least that's my goal.

    Portfolio-http://apug.org/forums/portfolios.php?u=25518

  6. #6
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    The scratches in the sample you attached are white. With scratches first we need to know whether they are white or black.. White = back of film, Black = emulsion side. You are lucky. The black ones are much harder to fix, except in photoshop. They are scratches that remove the image.

    You used to be able to buy No Scratch, a liquid that you could smear on the back of the film. Since the scratches are grooves in the film, the No Scratch filled them in and being of a similar index of refraction to the film base, the scratches disappeared. Of course you would need to clean the film off after printing.

    Maybe you can't get No Scratch anymore. No Problem! Use Nose Scratch! Rub your finger on the side of your nose, and smear the oil you get from there on the back of the film! I'm not kidding, it works! This is a time honored technique. Still, you need to clean the film afterward.

    Speculation on the topic of whether No Scratch was in fact harvested from teenaged boys: No definitive answer.

    If all else fails, use scanning fluid.

    These small mystery scratches are often observed. They can result from handling on the light table, or perhaps even from passing fruitflies racing to catch a banana.

  7. #7
    bobwysiwyg's Avatar
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    WYSIWYG - At least that's my goal.

    Portfolio-http://apug.org/forums/portfolios.php?u=25518

  8. #8

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    Dow Corning High Vacuum grease works well, also. It is silicone-based and doesn't oxidize as does 'nose grease', so you don't need to remove it. The stuff is so tenacious that it is difficult to remove, anyway.

    I also found some silicone grease at the local hardware store that does just as well and costs much less.

    $g

  9. #9
    bowzart's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Scandium View Post
    Dow Corning High Vacuum grease works well, also. It is silicone-based and doesn't oxidize as does 'nose grease', so you don't need to remove it. The stuff is so tenacious that it is difficult to remove, anyway.

    I also found some silicone grease at the local hardware store that does just as well and costs much less.

    $g
    Hard to beat the cost of Nose Grease. I'd be a bit leary about anything that I can't remove, personally. But thanks, it is interesting.

  10. #10
    miklosphoto's Avatar
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    Thank you guys for the answers.
    Now, can I use the No Scratch with a scanner too? Nikon Coolscan 5000, I wonder if the liquid would damage the scanner?

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