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  1. #1
    pierods's Avatar
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    dust on my ALL my negs

    I am quite frustrated...true, I don't take any particular precaution when drying my film, I just hang it in a quiet room, but I have at least one speck of dust on every frame...

    How do you guys do? Any tricks?

  2. #2
    Akki14's Avatar
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    can of air to dust. anti-static cloth. Don't bother scanning as I've never had a good clean scan - too many surfaces and can't clean the inside of the glass on a flatbed scanner. I prefer to print where possible, scanning maybe as a proofing tool.
    ~Heather
    oooh shiny!
    http://www.stargazy.org/

  3. #3
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    Is the dust really stuck to the film or will it brush/blow off.

    This may sound strange to most people, but if you clean your darkroom too much, you get more dust. You stir it up in the cleaning. Also, it is important to maintain a level of humidity in your work areas. If an area is too dry, the problem with static charges becomes unmanageable. For this reason, I never would empty the wash tank or tray.

    Want more dust? Invite your cat to print with you. Occasionally, rub him with a glass rod! That'll keep those particles a-flyin!

  4. #4

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    I agree with Bowzart about the stirring up of the dust. Perhaps a trick would be to photo-flow your reel in the bathroom, get a little hot shower steam up before you hang the film, that would certainly help with airborne particles. Then just keep the cat/dog/wife/kids out for a while. Good luck!

  5. #5
    pierods's Avatar
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    Thanks!

  6. #6
    dances_w_clouds's Avatar
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    dusty negs

    I had that problem until I started using photo-flo. Now I just soak them in it for 2 minutes, hang by window NO DUST. The coating leaves a sheen on them that doesn't retain dust.

  7. #7
    johnnywalker's Avatar
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    I use a Paterson tank to develope and wash the film. I take the cannisters, shake the excess water out and put them in a slightly larger diameter tube mounted vertically on the wall (there's a piece of wooden rod on the bottom to keep the film cannisters from falling out). I stick a hair dryer into the top of the tube, and turn on the fan only (no heat, but it does warm the air anyway). The hair dryer has an air filter cut to fit the air intake. After about half an hour I take the film out, cut it to length (6 negs per section) and put the negative strips in plastic sleeves. I still get the occasional bit of dust, but it is not stuck to the negative and is easily brushed off.
    I read about this system somewhere (probably here) and use it for all my 35mm now. I have way less dust than I used to when I hung the whole roll. So far I haven't had any curling problems with any of the films I've used (mostly all of the Ilford films).
    Anybody else use this or something similar?
    If I had been present at the creation, I would have given some useful hints for the better arrangement of the Universe.
    Alfonso the Wise, 1221-1284

  8. #8
    pierods's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by johnnywalker View Post
    I use a Paterson tank to develope and wash the film. I take the cannisters, shake the excess water out and put them in a slightly larger diameter tube mounted vertically on the wall (there's a piece of wooden rod on the bottom to keep the film cannisters from falling out). I stick a hair dryer into the top of the tube, and turn on the fan only (no heat, but it does warm the air anyway). The hair dryer has an air filter cut to fit the air intake. After about half an hour I take the film out, cut it to length (6 negs per section) and put the negative strips in plastic sleeves. I still get the occasional bit of dust, but it is not stuck to the negative and is easily brushed off.
    I read about this system somewhere (probably here) and use it for all my 35mm now. I have way less dust than I used to when I hung the whole roll. So far I haven't had any curling problems with any of the films I've used (mostly all of the Ilford films).
    Anybody else use this or something similar?
    you mean, you leave the film on the reel and don't use wetting agent?

  9. #9
    Steve Smith's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Akki14 View Post
    I've never had a good clean scan - too many surfaces and can't clean the inside of the glass on a flatbed scanner.
    I don't have a scanner so I use the one at work - but only for uploads to the gallery here.
    If I ever got a flatbed scanner for film scanning I think I would replace the glass with a piece of Perspex (Plexiglass) with the film area cut out.



    Steve.
    "People who say things won't work are a dime a dozen. People who figure out how to make things work are worth a fortune" - Dave Rat.

  10. #10
    MarcoGiardini's Avatar
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    i find very important the way used to dry the film. I use a Durst dryer using filtered air so that while wet no dust goes on the film. Once dry dust is not a problem to remove with air!

    marco

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