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  1. #1

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    Polytoner Approximation

    Does anybody have an opinion as to the proportions of selenium toner and "brown" toner one should mix to approximate Kodak polytoner? Or would split toning be a better approach?

  2. #2
    Robert Hall's Avatar
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    There are several formula out there as to mix polytoner type formula. One I have seen is on Kodak's site.

    They all give slightly different pallets depending on the paper and what formula you use. If you are not looking for a specific effect, then split toning would not be a bad way to go, or simply using one or the other.

    What exactly is the purpose of your toning? Merely archivability, or are you looking for a color as well?
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  3. #3

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    Search kodak.com for cis268.pdf which describes a procedure.

  4. #4

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    Quote Originally Posted by Photoe View Post
    Does anybody have an opinion as to the proportions
    of selenium toner and "brown" toner one should mix
    to approximate Kodak polytoner?
    Apparently KRST's archival characteristics were due
    to minute amounts of sulfide contamination. That was
    in KRST's early years. Later sulfide-less KRST did not
    retain that archival character.

    A very small portion of polysulfide added to KRST, I'd
    think, would restore it's archival character. Dan

  5. #5

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    So Then the Question.

    Quote Originally Posted by dancqu View Post
    Apparently KRST's archival characteristics were due
    to minute amounts of sulfide contamination. That was
    in KRST's early years. Later sulfide-less KRST did not
    retain that archival character.

    A very small portion of polysulfide added to KRST, I'd
    think, would restore it's archival character. Dan
    So then the question. Why did Kodak not restore the
    'contaminating' sulfur compounds to the more recent
    KRST? In doing so we would have a selenium toner
    with archival characteristics.

    ALL of the above is according to the IPI's research
    into Life Expectancy of selenium and sulfur treated
    microfilms. Print paper having a small grain silver
    image similar to microfilm is thought to react
    in the same manor. Dan

  6. #6

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    Quote Originally Posted by dancqu View Post
    "
    Apparently KRST's archival characteristics were due
    to minute amounts of sulfide contamination."

    So then the question. Why did Kodak not restore the
    'contaminating' sulfur compounds to the more recent
    KRST? In doing so we would have a selenium toner
    with archival characteristics.Dan
    This supposed sulphur contamination is in fact conjecture, not proven fact.
    The research was on microfilm and it seems likely that the results may be transferrable to other emulsions - but this further research was not carried out AFAIK.
    The authors were careful to state that "It is our strong feeling that the changes in formulation that suddenly rendered dilute selenium toner ineffective relate to the sulfiding action of minor constituents" and "Apparently insignificant manufacturing changes may have caused this active agent to be no longer present;" ... and so on.
    Testing old samples however failed to reveal this suspected contamination however, and further research was not funded, so 20 years later it remains theoretical I believe. (Based on discussion with research paper author).
    Tim



 

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