Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 73,565   Posts: 1,621,810   Online: 721
      
Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 11 to 17 of 17
  1. #11

    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Paris (France, not Texas)
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    283
    As I said, Wolfgang Moersch had the same problem, with HP5+ and Delta 3200.

  2. #12

    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Cheshire UK
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    1,968
    Dear Philippe

    Well get him to send his back as well and we will check it out.....what more can I do !

    Regards

    Simon ILFORD photo / HARMAN technology Limited :

  3. #13

    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Paris (France, not Texas)
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    283
    Dear Simon

    I'll definitely will! I thought he had already be in touch with you.
    The same problem happened to Jean-Claude Dal Cin, from Adaflex, and during a workshop: rather embarrassing for him.

  4. #14
    Ian Grant's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    West Midlands, UK, and Turkey
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    16,683
    Images
    148
    Philippe you stated "lots of black spots in the highlights!... Wolfgang thought it was because of the high alkalinity of Tanol (pH10,5 I think)" perhaps you should wait and see what Ilford say after they've looked at the negatives.

    It's extremely rare to get coating problems with modern films, over the past 40 years I've only ever seen 2 or 3 negatives where there was a coating problem, and that was with Adox film, and pin-holes. But it is quite well known that with some very alkali developers the shock of plunging negatives into stop-bath can cause these problems, I had this happen once back in the 70's. It affected the whole film, but as that came from a bulk reel of FP4 and no other films from the same 100" roll were affected it was quite obviously a processing problem.

    Tanol may well have tanning effects but a high pH softens the emulsion quite significantly. It is often recommenced that you soak a print that's been fixed with a hardening fixer in a strong Carbonate solution specifically to soften the emulsion before toning, that's the effects of a high pH.

    So it may not be the film, it could well be the developer, particularly as you say Wolfgang had it happen to two entirely different types of film.

    Ian
    Last edited by Ian Grant; 06-05-2008 at 02:02 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  5. #15

    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Paris (France, not Texas)
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    283
    Sorry, but this also happened to a friend using D23, which is not known for its high alkalinity -
    The problem with Adox/Efke films is caused by a too acid stop bath, but at least it's said in the Fotoimpex catalogue (German version, I don't have the English one).
    By the way, I noticed coating problems on 120 Delta 400 some years ago... and Michel Beaumont (Ilford France, at the time) never wanted to believe me, till I sacrified an unexposed film and looked at it through the light: the poor coating was visible!... This time I contacted Ilford again, and talked to a Monsieur Escoffier. When he asked the kind of soup I used, and I said "pyro", he asked me what that is!
    I accept to take the risk of using "exotic" films (the late Forte, Foma, Efke, Rollei, Maco and so on) because I like sometimes the results, I know that it is sometimes risky and don't use them for professional jobs. BUT THEN I PAY HALF THE PRICE!!!
    I simply think I won't buy Ilford anymore: it's especially enerving when you shoot 4x5 and 8x10, which was the case!

    PS: forgive my rusty English.

  6. #16
    Les McLean's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Northern England on the Scottish border
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,609
    Quote Originally Posted by Philippe Grunchec View Post
    Sorry, but this also happened to a friend using D23, which is not known for its high alkalinity -
    The problem with Adox/Efke films is caused by a too acid stop bath, but at least it's said in the Fotoimpex catalogue (German version, I don't have the English one).
    By the way, I noticed coating problems on 120 Delta 400 some years ago... and Michel Beaumont (Ilford France, at the time) never wanted to believe me, till I sacrified an unexposed film and looked at it through the light: the poor coating was visible!... This time I contacted Ilford again, and talked to a Monsieur Escoffier. When he asked the kind of soup I used, and I said "pyro", he asked me what that is!
    I accept to take the risk of using "exotic" films (the late Forte, Foma, Efke, Rollei, Maco and so on) because I like sometimes the results, I know that it is sometimes risky and don't use them for professional jobs. BUT THEN I PAY HALF THE PRICE!!!
    I simply think I won't buy Ilford anymore: it's especially enerving when you shoot 4x5 and 8x10, which was the case!

    PS: forgive my rusty English.

    I can understand your frustration but surely you have to give Ilford the opportunity to examine the fault before making the decision not to use their film again. I can assure you that they are always strictly honest and if they find that the problem was in the manufacture of the film they will hold their hands up and admit it.
    "Digital circuits are made from analogue parts"
    Fourtune Cookie-Brooklyn May 2006

    Website: www.lesmcleanphotography.com

  7. #17
    naaldvoerder's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    605
    Images
    26
    Quote Originally Posted by Simon R Galley View Post
    Dear Jaap,

    Base fog does seem high for a film manufactured in 2004 or 2005, although well within our manufacturing tolerances, as always with ILFORD Photo products you can return it to us and we will check it out.



    Kind Regards

    Simon ILFORD photo / HARMAN technology Limited :
    Thanks for your reply Simon. I don't think there is much need for sending the film to Ilford. I, for one, am pretty sure that there is nothing wrong with the film, but my storage/processing needs improving. Actually that was the reason for posing my question. Could you indicate what the manufacturing tolerances are and what base + fog you would expect from well stored and well processed HP5? I would like to know what i should be aiming for. On the processing side, I have been using and reussing 1 liter of fix 1:4 for 4 minutes. This liter of fix has been used for no more than 10 filmes but over a period of several months with some highes room temperatures (24 C) in my darkroom this summer. Is this a likely reason for a highish b+f in your opinion?

    On a side note, thanks for showing this level of customer support. It is a major factor in my resolution to keep using Ilford films as long as you lot keep making them.

    Jaap Jan

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin