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  1. #11
    rwyoung's Avatar
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    Personally, I don't use a print for the residual HYPO test. You could use part of the white border if you wish. But for me it is just easier to cut a strip from a sheet of paper from the same batch and process it without exposure.

    As I understand the residual test instructions, you remove the sheet from the wash, pat dry (it will be damp and emulsion thus soft) and place on the drop. Time for 2 minute then blot off. If the drop leaves a visible stain then wash some more. If you are testing on a finished print and the test says it passes, put the print back in the wash for 5 minutes or so to remove the test solution. It will over time leave a spot due to the silver nitrate in the test solution.

    FYI : http://unblinkingeye.com/Articles/Ar.../archival.html is a good article to read.
    Don't sweat the petty things and don't pet the sweaty things! http://rwyoung.wordpress.com

  2. #12
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    I have a very nice print washer, but I have found that I don't need to run it the whole time. Once I put the prints in I run it for about ten minutes, and then let the prints soak. Every ten minutes or so I run the washer to turn the water over. At the end of an hour or so I run it again for about ten minutes. The prints test clear. I save a lot of water this way over running the washer for a solid hour, but it doesn't cut down time. I think that it just plain takes time to soak the fix out, and I don't know any short cut around that.

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lowell Huff View Post
    Washing any emulsion for more than ten minutes is a waste of your life.
    My fiber prints at ten minutes still contain a measurable amount of fix. While RC clears readily in ten minutes or so (indeed far less with a wash aid), this is very poor advice for fiber.

  4. #14
    CBG
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    Quote Originally Posted by hansformat View Post
    ... Each print individually 10 minutes in washaid ... 3. Any other ideas?
    I may be missing something right in front of my nose, but I don't see any benefit to the individualized trip through the wash aid. I'd batch the whole group.

    I might also put forward the thought of a two bath fix in alkaline papid fix. Alkaline fix is supposed to make the removal of silver by-products from the paper easier, faster and more efficient, as well as being less likely to overfix the print.

    C

  5. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Hoskinson View Post
    If you use 2 fixing baths (see Ansel Adams and
    Grant Haist). You can improve fixing and shorten
    the time needed to wash out the residual fixer.
    For those who STILL process in the usual manor
    I think at least one of A. Adams' work flows has
    much to recommend. That method took prints
    from a stop to an acid fix to a hold. Consider;
    developer - stop - fix - hold.

    Clear away the first three trays then, one or a few
    at a time, from the hold into a plain alkaline 2nd fix.
    A good follow through would be a rinse - hca - rinse
    sequence. Again one or a few at a time. Then off to
    the wash. So no more than two trays need be in
    use at any one time. Dan

  6. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ira Rush View Post
    Agfa which of course is long gone, used to
    recommend the use of a "soda intermediate bath",
    for fibre based paper. The following clip is from
    one of the old data sheets.

    [B]Soda intermediate bath
    A soda bath (1 % sodium carbonate solution) should
    be included for fibre-base paper, between fixer and final
    wash (time: 3 minutes). ............ Ira
    I mention Agfa's carbonate hca now and then. It is easily
    an effective hypo clearing agent trailing sulfite only moderately.
    Importantly carbonate does not oxidize. I wonder it is not more
    universally used. Dan

  7. #17

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    "I may be missing something right in front of my nose, but I don't see any benefit to the individualized trip through the wash aid. I'd batch the whole group."

    Now this is interesting. The way I have interpreted the washing steps from several books are that each print goes into the washaid by itself.

    If I can batch them up for 10 or 15 minutes in one bath and just shuffle them around and agitate appropriately then I can dramatically cut down the amount of time this process takes.

    Do people put their prints in washaid in batches like this?

    Thanks

    Jason.

  8. #18
    rwyoung's Avatar
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    In my case it depends on the size of the print. Being cheap, I don't have a lot of extra trays so the one that has been dedicated to HCA happens to be a shallow 11x14. So for 11x14, one at a time and constant agitation. For 8x10, two at a time and constant agitation. For 5x7 and postcards 4+ and constant agitation. But I also track the capacity vs print ratio. HCA is inexpensive so better to err on the side of under-utilization of the working solution than to exhaust it and get no benefit.
    Don't sweat the petty things and don't pet the sweaty things! http://rwyoung.wordpress.com

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