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  1. #1
    Martin Aislabie's Avatar
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    Wait 24hrs after mixing ID11?

    I was told be someone (I cannot remember who) that you should leave ID11 24hrs after mixing to settle before using it.

    Is this another old wives tale or is there soemthing to this ?

    Thanks

    Martin

  2. #2
    David A. Goldfarb's Avatar
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    It's a developer with a fair amount of sulfite that sometimes takes a while to dissolve, so it's not a bad idea to mix it in advance, but if you're able to mix it completely and it doesn't look like there's any undissolved powder in the container, then you should be able to use it.
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  3. #3
    PhotoJim's Avatar
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    You run the risk of having some of the chemicals precipitate if you cool it too quickly, so cooling it naturally makes sense. Since you mix it up a little over 50 degrees C, letting it cool to a comfortable 20 over at least a few hours is wise. I don't know that it's absolutely necessary to wait 24 hours, though.
    Jim MacKenzie - Regina, Saskatchewan, Canada

    A bunch of Nikons; Feds, Zorkis and a Kiev; Pentax 67-II (inherited from my deceased father-in-law); Bronica SQ-A; and a nice Shen Hao 4x5 field camera with 3 decent lenses that needs to be taken outside more. Oh, and as of mid-2012, one of those bodies we don't talk about here.

    Favourite film: do I need to pick only one?

  4. #4
    Anscojohn's Avatar
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    The old lab rats who first taught me darkroom insisted you should always wait 24 hours after mixing chems from powders before using them. Of couse, at that time, most of the chems came in metal cans they opened with their "church keys"--i.e. beer can openers--when they were not being put to their intended use.
    John, Mount Vernon, Virginia USA

  5. #5
    MikeSeb's Avatar
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    Commercial D-76 (not sure if true for ID-11) can also show a marked increase in activity over the first few weeks due to hydroquinone-induce pH changes. I use D76H, a homebrew version with no HQ and slightly more metol, which gets around this problem.

    This may be another aspect of the "old wives' tale", but it's true.
    Michael Sebastian
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  6. #6
    Aurum's Avatar
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    also you may find leaving the developer to stand for a while allows any dissolved air to come out on its own, rather than nucleating out on the film and causing uneven development
    "Flatter Me, and I May Not Believe You. Criticize Me, and I May Not like You. Ignore Me, and I May Not Forgive You. Encourage Me, and I Will Not Forget You."

  7. #7

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    I was taught years ago that it takes about 24 hours for D-76 to stabilize after being mixed. I don't know if that is true today, but it is a practice that I have continued. My negatives are remarkably consistent, so I'm fairly sure that the time frame for this stabilization is not weeks. If the time frame is weeks, then the differences between a day and a couple of weeks is small enough to be of no practical significance. Since ID-11 is a virtual clone of D-76, I would keep to the practice to be on the safe side.
    Frank Schifano

  8. #8
    David A. Goldfarb's Avatar
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    My impression is that modern packaged D-76 is buffered to prevent the contrast increase over time that it used to have. I haven't used it that much for a few years, so I haven't tested that claim myself.
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  9. #9
    Ian Grant's Avatar
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    When I used ID-11 in a commercial darkroom we always used it an hour or so after mixing, but as we replenished our deep tanks we would always season a fresh batch with a small amount of the previous batch.

    I still do the same with Xtol.

    Ian

  10. #10
    Martin Aislabie's Avatar
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    Thanks for the help guys.
    I guess its not a bad practice to make it up and leave it to settle and cool for a period.
    I always filter it when I decant it into 1L bottles
    Generaly I am orgainsed enough to be manage my ID11 levels of stock solution so I don't run out mid-session
    Martin

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