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Thread: Kodak Fixer

  1. #11

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    John,

    Check out this link to the Kodak web site, tech pubs.

    http://www.kodak.com/global/en/profe...is49/cis49.pdf
    The topic is "Preparing Smaller-Than-Package-Size
    Amounts of KODAK Processing
    Chemicals"

    Think this might help with other chemicals too


    Hope this helps
    Ira
    Last edited by Ira Rush; 06-13-2008 at 06:44 PM. Click to view previous post history. Reason: URL error

  2. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ira Rush View Post
    John,

    Check out this link to the Kodak web site, tech pubs.

    http://www.kodak.com/global/en/profe...is49/cis49.pdf
    The topic is "Preparing Smaller-Than-Package-Size
    Amounts of KODAK Processing
    Chemicals"
    I looked at this link and noticed the following near the end.

    " Liquid chemical concentrates are uniform throughout.
    You can use small portions as needed to mix any amount of
    working solution. However, with dry chemicals, mix the
    entire contents at one time because the chemicals are not
    uniform throughout. Shipping and handling will cause the
    ingredients to settle in different ways. As a result, working
    solutions made from portions of dry packaged chemicals
    may be nonuniform and inconsistent. Once dry chemicals
    are converted to liquid working solutions, you can then
    subdivide them for use and storage."

    Basically, it's not a good idea to try to divide dry mix chemicals to make smaller quantities. Not if you want to ensure you have the real mcCoy for your film or papers. Certainly, with film, you cannot get those shots back again - your negatives are pretty special after all.

    You can get away with it, but it makes sense to mix the whole dry batch up and divide up the solutions into smaller quantities.
    John
    www.pictorialplanet.com

  3. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by JohnFinch View Post
    I looked at this link and noticed the following near the end.

    " Liquid chemical concentrates are uniform throughout.
    You can use small portions as needed to mix any amount of
    working solution. However, with dry chemicals, mix the
    entire contents at one time because the chemicals are not
    uniform throughout. Shipping and handling will cause the
    ingredients to settle in different ways. As a result, working
    solutions made from portions of dry packaged chemicals
    may be nonuniform and inconsistent. Once dry chemicals
    are converted to liquid working solutions, you can then
    subdivide them for use and storage."

    Basically, it's not a good idea to try to divide dry mix chemicals to make smaller quantities. Not if you want to ensure you have the real mcCoy for your film or papers. Certainly, with film, you cannot get those shots back again - your negatives are pretty special after all.

    You can get away with it, but it makes sense to mix the whole dry batch up and divide up the solutions into smaller quantities.
    This is fixer! Not developer. And if the problem is some (probably theoretical) settling during trucking, mix the chems up after opening the pouch.

    Carpe chemicals.

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