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  1. #11

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    Read the data sheet before you gather too much...

    It is an ISO 1000 film with Ilford's methods of testing. Notice on the package that it is NOT labeled as "ISO 3200", but only uses EI 3200 as part of the proper name for the film. IMHO, they should change the name to Delta Super Speed or something similar to avoid all the confusion. There must be one post a week asking the same basic thing about this film.

    So, it is ISO 1000, but Like all films, you can get usable results at a variety of ratings, with certain trade offs, of course. It follows the general rule of thumb for films: the higher the speed, the lower the contrast, the more grain, and the less sharpness and resolution you will get.

    The great thing about this film is that it allows you to get lots of nice, neatly-patterned grain without giving you too much contrast.

    If you want a more grungy, clumpy grain, I would overexpose HP5 by about two or three stops and give it development in a weak dilution of a harsh developer for an extended time, at a high temperature. When I shoot for gnarly grain, I rate HP5 at 50 or 100, and develop in highly diluted D-19 at 75F for about 12-15 minutes. I often have to bleach back the negs a bit to make printing easier.

    My zone system EI for this film in my C33 with the 80mm lens is 640...but that is for my particular setup and developing methods. Very rarely will I shoot this film in a situation in which I will be using the zone system. I find that, in non-zone system use, it needs to be rated at at least 2000 to get a "normal" looking amount of contrast in a "normal contrast" lighting situation. I usually rate it at 4000 or 8000 in a low-contrast lighting situation. In the situations in which I *most often* shoot this film, I don't give one hoot about shadow detail. All I care about is from about zone V on up.

    I would start by calling it 1000, and see if it has enough contrast for your situation. If not, rate it higher the next time you shoot it.
    Last edited by 2F/2F; 06-18-2008 at 09:48 PM. Click to view previous post history.
    2F/2F

    "Truth and love are my law and worship. Form and conscience are my manifestation and guide. Nature and peace are my shelter and companions. Order is my attitude. Beauty and perfection are my attack."

    - Rob Tyner (1944 - 1991)

  2. #12
    david b's Avatar
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    So does this sound about right?

    Delta 3200 at 1600 in xtol 1+1 for 20 minutes at 68 degrees ?

  3. #13

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    I don't know exactly, but it sounds long to me. I would just start with what the box sez to do for 800, and then add a little bit to that. Look at the box. Look at the data sheet. The info on them is published for a reason.
    Last edited by 2F/2F; 06-19-2008 at 05:15 PM. Click to view previous post history.
    2F/2F

    "Truth and love are my law and worship. Form and conscience are my manifestation and guide. Nature and peace are my shelter and companions. Order is my attitude. Beauty and perfection are my attack."

    - Rob Tyner (1944 - 1991)

  4. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by david b View Post
    So does this sound about right?

    Delta 3200 at 1600 in xtol 1+1 for 20 minutes at 68 degrees ?
    the massive development chart shows 15 minutes at 75 so I am not sure if you are in ballpark or not.

  5. #15
    Chazzy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by david b View Post
    Actually, I am looking for a bit of grain. Nothing too crazy but a nice, noticeable grain.
    I've never understood this concept of nice, noticeable grain.
    Charles Hohenstein

  6. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chazzy View Post
    I've never understood this concept of nice, noticeable grain.
    Come on! Let's keep religion out of it! If I believed in smiley's I'd put one here.

    Larry

  7. #17
    bowzart's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by david b View Post
    So does this sound about right?

    Delta 3200 at 1600 in xtol 1+1 for 20 minutes at 68 degrees ?
    Why not run a test? It's not that hard to do.

  8. #18
    Barry S's Avatar
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    I've shot a lot of Delta 3200 rated at EI 1600 and my standard roll film developer is XTOL 1+1. I found the optimal small tank processing time using 5 second inversions every minute to be about 12 minutes at 68 degrees for a condenser enlarger. My experience is that all the T-grain films look terrible (sooty/grainy) if overdeveloped, so, I'd run some clip tests and work your way *up* from a short developing time.

  9. #19
    bowzart's Avatar
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    David,

    Do you have a basic understanding of the Zone system? If so, you can learn to completely test in a film/developer in an afternoon's time. Empirical tests are ok; people generally do it that way because they don't want to take the time to do it using controls. A controlled test is not that difficult. A bit more time out front saves vast amounts of time and money later, and you can work from confidence, rather than uncertainty. Besides, the results you find would be very useful for others in the group.

    I believe that the 35mm and the 6cm emulsions are the same. You can get two full zone tests out of one 36 exp roll.

    If you are interested, I can work up a method over the weekend. I've made one before; just only have the hardcopy and I know it can be improved. I'm going on a trip this weekend and my wife does the driving (my driving scares her even more than hers scares me!), so I'll have plenty of time.

  10. #20

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    I've used some Delta 3200 in roll film and processed with D76 for about 20 minutes to get 6400 ASA that is grainy but makes an interesting image. I've used the Kodak Tmax 3200 in 35mm with good results, but the Delta 3200 seems to have somewhat different qualities.

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