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  1. #1

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    Is Emaks Slow To Develop?

    For some time I've thought I was giving Emaks FB Glossy
    plenty of time to fully develop. I've lately experimented with
    contrast control through shorter exposures and longer development.
    Now I've found with normal exposures increased density is quite
    evident up to at least 100% more development.

    Short or long exposures, short or longer development, blacks
    have been very good. What's the answer? Dan

  2. #2

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    Dear Dan,

    You are not alone in this observation. There was an article in the May/June 2004 View Camera magazine comparing multiple papers and developers using developing times ranging from 2 to 6 minutes. Some combinations required the full 6 minutes before it met the author's approval. I think these were his personal visual observations rather than using a densitometer or even a scanner, but I'm confident they are legitimate.

    Neal Wydra

  3. #3

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    Yes, Emacs is kind of "special" and very old-fashioned. Apart from the difference in between production runs, you've ran into another peculiarity. Once you find the receipe though, the results can be very good indeed. In general these papers are at their best when you want good separation in the shadows, which you seem to have noticed.
    But again, the next box of papers can respond in a different way... Emacs paper used to cost substancially less than e.g. Ilford paper, but some of that money had to be used to get on track again when buying a new box of papers.

    //Bj÷rn

  4. #4

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    I use Emaks grade 2 in Ansco 130. I find that 2-2 1/2 minutes is more then enough development time.

  5. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by Neal View Post
    Dear Dan,
    You are not alone in this observation. There was an article
    in the May/June 2004 View Camera magazine comparing multiple
    papers and developers using developing times ranging from 2 to 6
    minutes. Some combinations required the full 6 minutes before it
    met the author's approval. I think these were his personal visual
    observations rather than using a densitometer or even a scanner,
    but I'm confident they are legitimate. Neal Wydra
    My findings may be due to the metol only developer I've been
    using; Beer's 1. Ansco 120 is a same developer. The two may
    be slow with any paper because the metol is not regenerated.
    Hydroquinone though does regenerate metol and does it in
    situ. I'd think that could only work to speed development.
    Glycin may also regenerate metol.

    Beer's is similar to A. Adam's split version of Ansco 130.
    Both, with the addition of hydroquinone, allow for contrast
    control. I'll need to test with one of the blends to verify
    my theory. Dan

  6. #6

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    Dear Dan,

    Your abilities with Chemistry are well beyond mine! I wish you success in your endeavors.

    Neal Wydra

  7. #7
    mmcclellan's Avatar
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    I love this paper and use it all the time. My standard developing time is 3 minutes (2 for almost all others) and I sometimes split that between Selectol-Soft and Zone VI Developer. Since that is my standard, all the testing is done with that time, so I seldom if ever find I need to go beyond that.

    It's truly wonderful paper, though!
    Michael McClellan
    Documentary Photographer
    Ann Arbor, Michigan
    http://www.MichaelMcClellan.com

  8. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by mmcclellan View Post
    I love this paper and use it all the time.
    My standard developing time is 3 minutes
    (2 for almost all others) ... It's truly
    wonderful paper, though!
    I wonder what you'd find if two exposed
    the same prints were given 3 and 5 minute
    development. I suspect you have made some
    similar test. Has the additional development
    time made any difference? Dan

  9. #9

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    Emaks is 2x faster than Forte Polywarmtone Plus if you are discussing projection speed. Tray speed is similar to most other non developer incorporated papers. Two to three min should fully develop the paper tones with LPD, Dektol, or Ilford PQ. Any fiber paper takes about 40s for the entire faint image to appear on the paper.

    This is an outstanding paper even if graded. I working around contrast issues by alternating between a condenser and dichro head using grade 2 and 3 without relying on a normal/soft paper developer to control contrast. I appreciate the rich blacks, separated mid-tones, and ability to tone to a light grey brown or cooler print color.
    RJ

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Richard Jepsen View Post
    This is an outstanding paper even if graded.
    SINCE it's graded you mean...? Okay- I'm a graded paper snob... despite popular opinion - I find I get much greater depth and 'snap' out of graded papers - even compared to the most recent species of multigrade papers. Maybe I'm alone in this.

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