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  1. #11
    bobwysiwyg's Avatar
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    The Jobo clips look like plastic clothes pins. Anyone ever try those? What's special about the Jobo's?
    WYSIWYG - At least that's my goal.

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  2. #12
    David A. Goldfarb's Avatar
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    Plastic clothespins hang the sheet parallel to the line. Jobo clips hang the sheet perpendicular to the line, so you can fit many more sheets on the line, particularly with larger formats.

    Clothespins have a larger area of contact with the sheet and larger sheets sometimes slip from the clothespin. Jobo clips pierce the sheet with a pin, so they have a tiny area of contact with the sheet, and even very large sheets (my largest are 11x14" and 7x17") never slip out of the clip.
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  3. #13

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    When I do this, I develop, wash and fix in tubes or tanks. I use dilute Rodinal, water rinse (no stop bath), TF-4 (rapid fixing plus rapid washing), Edwal LFN Low Foam Wetting Agent for Final Rinse and Jobo clips.
    Tom Hoskinson
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  4. #14
    bobwysiwyg's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by David A. Goldfarb View Post
    Plastic clothespins hang the sheet parallel to the line. Jobo clips hang the sheet perpendicular to the line, so you can fit many more sheets on the line, particularly with larger formats.

    Clothespins have a larger area of contact with the sheet and larger sheets sometimes slip from the clothespin. Jobo clips pierce the sheet with a pin, so they have a tiny area of contact with the sheet, and even very large sheets (my largest are 11x14" and 7x17") never slip out of the clip.
    Makes sense, thanks.
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  5. #15

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    I don't often recommend HC-110, but this situation practically screams for the product. It is highly concentrated, and has a very good shelf life. It was designed for this type of work. Development times are very short, but can be extended with higher than usual dilutions. I'll leave it to you to figure out the times that work for you. A single small bottle can process lots of film. It is well known, and well documented with many different films. For large format films, it's a no-brainer. Image quality with D-76 will be theoretically better. It doesn't matter. The large format negative has information to spare for all but the biggest enlargements. Proper stop bath, if you choose to use it, beats the pants off vinegar. For use as a stop bath, vinegar is diluted with an equal part of water. Kodak's indicating stop bath is cheap and is diluted with 63 parts of water. A quart (litre - close enough for this stuff) of white vinegar will yield 2 quarts of non-indicating stop bath. A single ounce of Kodak stop bath will yield 1/2 gallon (2L) of indicating stop bath. You tell me which is easier to carry around. Fixer can be a problem, though I'd probably go with a rapid fixer concentrate. You can use it as a one shot fixer by diluting it more than recommended. For drying, how about one of those round things with clothes pins attache that you get at the dollar store. They hold a dozen sheets of film and might cost a whole $1.29. I use 'em at home and have never had a film slip loose. $7 for a film hanger? Blashphemy!
    Frank Schifano

  6. #16
    Ria
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    Quote Originally Posted by Les McLean View Post
    Some years ago I developed film as I travelled on the East Coast on the US and found that there were differences in contrast from place to place. I was told that this may have been caused by changes of water...
    I would use distilled water to eliminate that particular variable.
    Ria

  7. #17
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    Why can't you wait until you get home? The film will be fine. I have developed film that was in a film box in room temperature out in the open exposed to room light for over a year, and it turned out fine. Just don't open the box with the film in it and you will be fine!

    Developing on the road is probably only worth packing the kit if you need to send something off on a deadline.

    If you have to do it, I would use HC. I would also not bother skipping the stop. It will last as a single bottle of working solution for your whole trip, and will extend the life of your fixer. For fixer, a non-hardening, liquid concentrate like Ilford Rapid Fixer would be best, to save wash time. (Small 500 mL bottle of fixer concentrate will be more than fine.) It is worth it to bring washaid for the same reason. Photo Flo will help too, especially in such unknown water conditions, and it is also highly concentrated. Developer, washaid, and photo flo can be chucked after each session. All you need to store for next session is the stop and the fixer. Then you need two or three beakers (dev., stop, fixer, reuse one for photo flo). For drying, you can use my favorite solution: bring a plastic collapsible wardrobe with you and hang little clips from a coat hanger; about three or four clips per hanger. And glassine envelopes so the film packs smaller and safer than plastic sleeves. Bring hypo check too, so you know when to mix new fixer.

    You can also do what sports and entertainment shooters sometimes used to do to beat the competition to the newswires at big events: Use Flash-Dry and light your film on fire to dry it. Be sure you blow it out in time!
    Last edited by 2F/2F; 06-30-2008 at 11:43 PM. Click to view previous post history.
    2F/2F

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  8. #18
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    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Why can't you wait until you get home? The film will be fine. I have developed film that was in a film box in room temperature out in the open exposed to room light for over a year, and it turned out fine. Just don't open the box with the film in it and you will b fine!
    ...

    If you need to do a snip test that one thing but waiting until you get home will allow you to relax, clean equipment, plan the next days shoot, and get some real rest for the mind and body, get a good meal etc..

    Curt
    Everytime I find a film or paper that I like, they discontinue it. - Paul Strand - Aperture monograph on Strand

  9. #19
    Jeff Bannow's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 2F/2F View Post
    Why can't you wait until you get home?
    I certainly could do so, but I think this would allow me to "know" I got the shot while I still have a chance to go back and reshoot. Besides that, it will reduce my chances of exposing all of my film while reloading holders! Which of course means I will probably fix my film before developing or something.

    There are lots of great suggestions here. Thanks everyone for chiming in.
    - Jeff (& sometimes Eva, too) - http://www.jeffbannow.com

  10. #20
    2F/2F's Avatar
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    "I certainly could do so, but I think this would allow me to "know" I got the shot while I still have a chance to go back and reshoot."

    First of all, you should just know whether you got the shot or not...especially with large format, where you have no reason to not know your exact camera settings and composition. You are spending at least a dollar a shot, so this alone is incentive enough to learn what the heck will be on your negs without having to develop them to find out. Second of all, if you are really that impatient and/or unsure, are really experimenting with something new and unknown to you, or are using flash, this is why the good folks at Fuji make instant film.

    "Besides that, it will reduce my chances of exposing all of my film while reloading holders!"

    You are just as likely, if not moreso, to expose your film loading your Nikkor tank. Either way you will have to unload and load holders. It takes less time and less fiddling to get sheets unloaded and into a box than it does to get them unloaded and into a Nikkor sheet film tank.

    "Which of course means I will probably fix my film before developing or something."

    In a less-than-ideal and unfamiliar lab, this is definitely more likely to occur than in your every-day lab!

    I would really think long and hard about the *why* before thinking any more about the *how*.
    Last edited by 2F/2F; 07-01-2008 at 07:36 AM. Click to view previous post history.
    2F/2F

    "Truth and love are my law and worship. Form and conscience are my manifestation and guide. Nature and peace are my shelter and companions. Order is my attitude. Beauty and perfection are my attack."

    - Rob Tyner (1944 - 1991)

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