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  1. #21

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    Really, 2F/2F, you dont see the difference between accidentally exposing two sheets vs an entire box? and you never make mistakes? Photography, for you, is such a perfect thing that you would suggest someone NOT take pictures because they admit to making mistakes. Everyone makes mistakes, whether you are a master photographer (which few are) or a novice. Besides, how else will you learn? Should you not take pictures on a trip and miss countless opportunities simply because you have not developed your craft to some impossible notion of perfection? I think not.

  2. #22
    Jeff Bannow's Avatar
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    Well, I recently moved up from medium format to 4x5. I find that my work is a lot more refined - I am forced to think more, move more slowly. However, at the same time I have a new light meter and it responds differently to unusual lighting than my last unit, and different lenses that I am still getting accustomed to.

    Also, last year on a trip to San Francisco one of my RZ67 backs developed a light leak during the trip, ruining about 15 rolls of film. Of course, we discovered this when we went to pick up the film after the trip was over. D'oh!

    Add to this, my changing tent is too small for working with my grafmatics. It gets cramped, and I get tired and sweaty (and irritable!). As a result I have forgotten to put away my unexposed sheet film after loading (only two sheets left thankfully.) I will be ordering a new tent before the trip to hopefully resolve this issue.

    I thought about going to fujiroid, but the options seem to require importing a holder and film from Japan at a high cost. Although, having instant film capability would be great.
    - Jeff (& sometimes Eva, too) - http://www.jeffbannow.com

  3. #23
    Jim Noel's Avatar
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    "* Take black plastic bags (huge trashcan sized) and blue tape to block out windows for changing."

    Black trash can bags will not block light. I once had a student who built a darkroom n her home and could not understand why her film and paper were always fogged. I took a look and found that I could almost read a newspaper in the darkroom which had these bags over the window.
    [FONT=Comic Sans MS]Films NOT Dead - Just getting fixed![/FONT]

  4. #24
    David A. Goldfarb's Avatar
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    If one is going to be traveling for some significant amount of time, I can see the attraction of film processing on the road, just to be sure you don't have some problem that you might not catch until the film is processed, like a light leak or a shutter that's due for a cleaning. One summer I was away shooting for about two months and processed the film back home and discovered a problem with fingerprints that I hadn't had before, because the fingerprints had remained on the unprocessed film for much longer than they normally would. Now I load film with nitrile gloves, and next time I'm on the road for that length of time, I'll be bringing a daylight processing tank and chemicals. It would also be nice to be able to get home and start printing, rather than slogging through a big backlog of film to process.
    flickr--http://www.flickr.com/photos/davidagoldfarb/
    Photography (not as up to date as the flickr site)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com/photo
    Academic (Slavic and Comparative Literature)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com

  5. #25
    keithwms's Avatar
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    Type 55 is the answer. <sniff>

    But how about a monobath approach with ordinary sheet film. Then I suppose you could do your processing in a large film changing tent. Just a thought.
    "Only dead fish follow the stream"

    [APUG Portfolio] [APUG Blog] [Website]

  6. #26
    Martin Aislabie's Avatar
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    My recommendation would be to box up the film and wait until I was home

    For several reasons:-
    Getting a clean working enviroment in a hotel room to dry the negs without dust - I have difficulty in a controlled enviroment with dust control
    A dark enough hotel room not to fog film while handling/developing
    Enough hours in the day - I find it takes several hours just to get set up to Dev film - after a long days shooting arriving home late & setting off early - extra time given up to Dev'ing doesn't leave much time for the other stuff like food & sleep

    I can see the idea of checking for faults in the equipment is attractive
    May be the best solution is to shoot stuff before you go to fully familiarise yourself with the new kit and then Dev sample shots throughout the trip just to check everything is still OK

    I wrap masking tape round my boxes of exposed film so they cannot fall open, then write on the outside of the box the exposed date

    I have never managed to do an extended period of shooting - 10 days is my maximum
    The boxes and boxes of film I bring home take me weeks & months to grind through
    Each time I promise myself to be selective in what I shoot and not to end up with so many similar shots (until the next time of course)

    Good luck, good shooting and good light

    Martin

  7. #27
    Don12x20's Avatar
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    [QUOTE=Jim Noel;649058 Black trash can bags will not block light. I once had a student who built a darkroom n her home and could not understand why her film and paper were always fogged. I took a look and found that I could almost read a newspaper in the darkroom which had these bags over the window.[/QUOTE]

    Don't buy cheap thin bags - get the thick ones.
    Try it again with multiple layers. It works. I've made on the road dark environments the same as the windowless darkroom at home (with no door light leaks either).
    Sit in the room for a while to allow the eyes to fully dialate and watch for light leakage problems.

    Black gaffers tape also works well to seal door edge light leaks - and it does not pull paint off the trim.
    Good luck

  8. #28
    mjs
    mjs is offline

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    The simplest solution to windows is aluminum foil, not trash bags. I used it for years in my darkroom over the garage; just duct-taped it over the windows.

    Mike

  9. #29
    Thomas Bertilsson's Avatar
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    Jeff,
    I nearly brought film developing equipment up to Photostock, but in retrospect I'm glad I didn't. There is no way I would have been able to muster up the energy to spend a couple of hours every night to develop film, after having spent the whole day shooting. Instead I figured I'd wait until I get home. Instead I decided to have as much time as possible to spend with all of my new friends and enjoy the experience of just being somewhere else. I find that if I'm tired and work laden, I have a tough time relaxing and making good photographs. Perhaps you're different from me.
    When I went on a recent trip to North Carolina I mailed my film back to the house and that's something you could try too to avoid mixing new and old film up.
    In the friendliest possible way, may I suggest not using equipment that is new to you on an adventure such as this? If you have lenses you haven't used before, cameras that you're not sure about - then that in itself is an X-factor to whether you're getting the results you want or not. It makes good sense to be familiar with the equipment you're using if you're in new territory.
    I hope you guys have a great time. I am looking forward to seeing what you guys caught at Bill's too.

    - Thomas
    "Often moments come looking for us". - Robert Frank

    "Make good art!" - Neil Gaiman

    "...the heart and mind are the true lens of the camera". - Yousuf Karsh

  10. #30
    2F/2F's Avatar
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    "Really, 2F/2F, you dont see the difference between accidentally exposing two sheets vs an entire box?"

    How would developing your film on the road make it more likely to expose only two sheets vs. a whole box? Better yet, why would either of these occur? I also trust it is a given that as much as possible will be done in a changing bag and at night. Under these conditions, you can make many mistakes, but exposing your film is not one of them. It's not hard: Just DON'T open a film box, any film box, in the light, unless it has been marked as empty. Where is this insane fear of exposing your film coming from? I have exposed 120/220 WAY more times than sheet film. I just dropped a roll of 220 color neg at a wedding two weeks ago right in front of the guests that I had just shot. 30 pix gone like that, and extra time and annoyance for everyone reshooting! It is far more easy to drop the whole 2-1/4 roll before it is sealed and horribly watch it unravel in the light than it is to deliberately open a box of 4x5 film in the light. If you are so afraid, just use Quickloads. They are "the bomb" for traveling anyhow.

    What developing on the road will do is make it more likely to mess up your film, in a variety of ways. Dust, scratches, misplacement etc. My POV was that these are more of a likelihood than accidental exposure.

    "and you never make mistakes?"

    I did not say that. Of course I make mistakes! See above. What I did was to suggest the route that will have the fewest chances for mistakes!

    "Photography, for you, is such a perfect thing that you would suggest someone NOT take pictures because they admit to making mistakes."

    I never suggested that, and I have no idea where your writings are coming from, as they appear to be a nonspecific preprepared rant that you have pointed my way after hearing a few key words in my earlier post. YOu obviously did not even read what I wrote. My suggestion to not take a mobile processing lab is nowhere close to suggesting photography is perfect or that someone not take pictures. I am in no way making an argument for perfection. I am making an argument for not doing unnecessary work that actually increases the chances of technical failure.

    "Everyone makes mistakes, whether you are a master photographer (which few are) or a novice. Besides, how else will you learn? Should you not take pictures on a trip and miss countless opportunities simply because you have not developed your craft to some impossible notion of perfection? I think not."

    Where did I say not to take pix because you might make a mistake?
    Last edited by 2F/2F; 07-01-2008 at 06:38 PM. Click to view previous post history.
    2F/2F

    "Truth and love are my law and worship. Form and conscience are my manifestation and guide. Nature and peace are my shelter and companions. Order is my attitude. Beauty and perfection are my attack."

    - Rob Tyner (1944 - 1991)

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