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Thread: Gigabitfilm

  1. #1
    bjorke's Avatar
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    Has anyone used this much? I'm fascinated and wonder just how many lenses could even begin to capture the 700-900lpmm that Gigabit claims for this stock (I suspect this is be). There's still no US distributor, correct?

    I'm tempted to use it for 35mm, since my recent work lends itself to huge magnifications (though I don't mind the grain I get from TMax and E100G now). Any suggestions or comments from actual users would be most welcome.

    TIA,

    "What Would Zeus Do?"
    KBPhotoRantPhotoPermitAPUG flickr Robot

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    Jeremy's Avatar
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    you can purchase gigabit film through j&c photo (link at the top of the page). I've never used nor heard much about it. My guess is that it's something along the lines of techpan as it has it's own special devloper a la technidol. (note: COMPLETE and utter guess)
    Let's see what I've got in the magic trash can for Mateo!

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    Aggie's Avatar
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    From what I understand its a contrast process copy film and its developed in a POTA developer. Not a new concept, remember H&W Control film? High contrast copy film and a low contrast developer. Your exposure latitude was about nil but the grain was nonexistant and let you see really how sharp your lens was (or wasn't).
    Gary Beasley

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    clogz's Avatar
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    The March/April 2001 issue of the Dutch magazine "Foto" has an extensive review about the Gigabit film. Their findings:600lp/mm is just theoretical. In daily practice, Gigabit film exposed at 40 Iso and developed in the dev. recommended by the manufacturers, has 100 -120 lp/mm.

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    bjorke's Avatar
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    What is the limiting factor? Just the difficulties inherent in camera mounting, etc, which often limit hand-holders to 30lpmm or less?

    Is there any web link?

    (Thoguht: The hi resolutions are beyond the reach of almost all scanners -- you'd have to make a print first. I've been wondering if my EL-Nikkors are even up to such a task)

    Thanks!

    "What Would Zeus Do?"
    KBPhotoRantPhotoPermitAPUG flickr Robot

  8. #8

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    I wonder if the high lp/mm numbers were done with special light. That is not normal daylight. To hit 900 you'd need a perfect lens at F/1.7 or so. Even 600 would need a perfect lens of about F/2.5. Maybe the CIA surplus bin?

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    Ed Sukach's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Robert
    I wonder if the high lp/mm numbers were done with special light. That is not normal daylight. To hit 900 you'd need a perfect lens at F/1.7 or so. Even 600 would need a perfect lens of about F/2.5. Maybe the CIA surplus bin?
    Hmm... Wondering about this. Do you have any references re: f/stops and resolution?
    Carpe erratum!!

    Ed Sukach, FFP.

  10. #10

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    Gigabit sheet film resolves 900lp/mm and the 35mm version resolves 700lp/mm. These figures apply for a contrast ratio of 1:1000, which is of very limited practical relevance. The more interesting specs are that sheet film resolves more than 350lp/mm at a contrast ratio of 1:1.6(!). The figures are evaluated by contact printing targets - no photographic lens, except those used for mask printing in the semiconductor industry, will be able to deliver resolutions up to 900lp/mm. But such high-resolution capabilities will make sure that every bit of information your lens delivers will actually be recorded.

    As far as resolution is concerned, Lens and film make up an optical system. The resulting resolution is not the resolution of the weakest element. The resulting resolution is determined by a mathematically complicated folding of optical functions. There is an approximation for this function, stating that the total resolution can be expressed as:
    1/R = 1/r1 + 1/r2,
    meaning that if the lens delivers a resolution of 100 lp/mm and film one of 160lp/mm (Velvia) the resulting resolution (usable Information) will be ~61 lp/mm. If your lens delivers 100 lp/mm and the film delivers 350lp/mm it will be ~77 lp/mm. So better resolution of either system always delivers better total resolution.

    Gigabitfilm is mainly microfilm that comes with a special developer. There are two different types of developer available (Type II and Type IV). Type II is processed at 36°C (like color processes) and always delivers a Gamma Value of 0.5, independent of development time (above required minimum) and exposure. Type IV can be processed at several temperatures and can produce different Gamma values.

    For more information, take a look at http://www.gigabitfilm.de/html/deutsch/menue_main.htm

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