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  1. #1

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    Developer Temperature Compensation Formula

    I did some searching, on here and am not finding much.

    I am looking for the formula for determining the temperature compensation for developers. Based on what I remember from chemistry class, I came up with the following formula:

    (10th root of 2)^ΔT for Celcius.

    [10th root of 2 raised to the differece in temperature]

    When looking at some of the charts I found online, it does not match up.

    Anyone out here know the formula?

    Thanks,

    Jason

    Jason

  2. #2
    Photo Engineer's Avatar
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    Jason;

    There is no rule AFAIK for adjusting development time with temperature. Kodak has published curves for time vs temp for several film and developer combinations. Some are posted on their web site.

    PE

  3. #3

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    As they say, "It depends!"

    Quote Originally Posted by schwefel View Post
    I did some searching, on here and am not finding much.

    I am looking for the formula for determining the temperature compensation for developers. Based on what I remember from chemistry class, I came up with the following formula:

    (10th root of 2)^ΔT for Celcius.

    [10th root of 2 raised to the differece in temperature]

    When looking at some of the charts I found online, it does not match up.

    Anyone out here know the formula?

    Thanks,

    Jason

    Jason
    Developers with one agent can have a defined delta, but each agent is different, although most of the common ones are pretty similar. Developers with two agents, with the ususal hydroquinone as one, is valid only in a narrow range. HQ changes activity at four times the rate of Metol, for instance (IIRC). Therefore, the negative characteristics will change with any significant change in temperature.

  4. #4
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    Ilford has a chart on their website as well.
    If I had been present at the creation, I would have given some useful hints for the better arrangement of the Universe.
    Alfonso the Wise, 1221-1284

  5. #5
    Lee L's Avatar
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    There's another recent thread on this is at: http://www.apug.org/forums/forum37/5...sate-temp.html

    I posted a .pdf chart there for D-76 time vs temp data from Kodak for multiple films. I've seen some formulae posted by Michael Covington and by others here on APUG, and also ran a regression recently to find out what made the Kodak Darkroom Dataguide development time vs temp wheel work. I got formulae, but if you look at the various specific manufacturer's time vs temp charts, you'll find that the formulae and curves found lying around are mostly generic, and designed to be close for most films and developers, and are probably close to exactly correct in a few cases.

    P.E. and others have the answer, there's not a single answer/formula for all films or all developers.

    Lee

  6. #6

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    The Ilford film datasheets each have a chart from which you can read off temp/time equivalents. But I guess they will all be based on ID11.

  7. #7
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    Here are Kodak's contrast curves for good old 35mm / 120 Tri X.
    Some have a similar slope, some do not.

    Kodak publishes a LOT of good info like this.

    Older data shows the effect of temperature.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Tri-X-developer-CI-times.jpg  

  8. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by schwefel View Post
    I did some searching, on here and am not finding much.

    I am looking for the formula for determining the temperature compensation for developers. Based on what I remember from chemistry class, I came up with the following formula:

    (10th root of 2)^ΔT for Celcius.

    [10th root of 2 raised to the differece in temperature]

    When looking at some of the charts I found online, it does not match up.

    Anyone out here know the formula?

    Thanks,

    Jason

    Jason
    Yes, Jason: The Arrhenius Rate Law is applicable
    Rate = A exp(-B/T)

    The constants A and B in the Arrhenius rate law are empirical and differ from one reaction to another. However, the empirical values of B are found to be similar for many chemical reactions. One result of this similarity is the useful generalization that for many reactions which occur near room temperature, a temperature increase of 10oC approximately doubles the rate of the reaction.

    Reference: http://www.ualberta.ca/~jplambec/che/p102/p02151.htm

    I use algebra to obtain the necessary constants from the published Kodak, Ilford, etc time and temperature development data for specific films and developers.
    Tom Hoskinson
    ______________________________

    Everything is analog - even digital :D

  9. #9

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    Or use Diafine!

  10. #10
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    For years I used this equation with a 'room temp.' method. The equation is taken from the Kodak darkroom dataguide. I remember using my first computer (Commadore 65) to decode the Kodak wheel back in the 80s. Later I put the equation into an Excel spreadsheet.

    New Decimal Time=((X_Constant*($B$6-(Temp * Y_Constant))/(1+(Temp * X_Constant)))+Y_Constant)*(LOG(A9))+($B$6-(Temp * Y_Constant))/(1+(Temp * X_Constant))


    x_constant =-0.6205672
    y_constant = -0.576929
    $B$6 = base time (min)
    Temp = base temp (degrees)
    A9 = new temp

    To convert to minutes and seconds:

    Minutes and seconds =INT(decimal time[-1]) + ((decimal time[-1]-INT(decimal time[-1])))*0.6


    (working spreadsheet available to anyone who asks)

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