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  1. #11
    df cardwell's Avatar
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    At normal contrast, with XTOL, TMY has a straight line from .15 to 1.8 ~ 2.1 depend on your agitation and dilution.

    Since it already is giving a linear resul (input = output), it seems impossible to increase the slope of the highlights without increasing the scale of the film. Using a two bath developer could give you a shoulder, which compresses the highlights, rather than separate them.

    You may be able to reduce the exposure by a stop or two, and increase the development. This WILL induce a toe and a curve,
    and while you will be compressing the shadows, you will increase the contrast of the highlights.

    OR, you may use a developer like HC-110 to introduce a toe and raise the highlight portion of the curve. This too will raise the overall scale of the film.

    The beauty of TMY for night photography is that it records such a long range of brightnesses in a useful way. A two bath, or water bath, for printing, makes easy work of seemingly unprintable negatives.

  2. #12

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    Ian,

    That may be with some of them. However, my experience with the ones that I have tried is that the temperature of Solution A is very important in how much reducer the emulsion can absorb. The temperature of Solution B is probably much less critical, though I have not specifically tested this.

    If you think about it you will see that the emulsion is gelatin and silver particles. The gelatin swells in water, and the warmer the water the more it can swell. The more it swells the more reducer it can absorb, and the more reducer it absorb the higher is the potential Dmax and average gradient of the negative.

    Of course, this is one area where films are very different. Some films have very hard emulsions that swell much less than others at a given temperature. Compare for example a film like Acros to a film like Efke PL100.

    Sandy King




    Quote Originally Posted by Ian Grant View Post
    I thought one of the advantages of Divided developers was they are semi-Panthermic so not temperature depenent within about a 6 degree C range.

    Ian

  3. #13
    Ian Grant's Avatar
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    Sandy

    I suspect that the temperature has an effect on both parts of the process, and that the reason it's said to be sort of Panthermic is the compensating effects of the developer means that the negatives are easy to print regardless of the temperature.

    Ian

  4. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by Paul Verizzo View Post
    Aren't those prints a bit hard to see at 1 x 1 1/2? Oh....... :rolleyes:
    Not too bad, Paul! My 73 year old eyes are still pretty good. And If I want a large contact print from a 35mm original, I make an enlarged negative.

    A lot easier, of course, to simply contact print the 8x10 neg I made of the same scene
    at the same time - or the 6x7, 6x9 or 6x12...
    Tom Hoskinson
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  5. #15

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    Compensation

    Quote Originally Posted by Matthew Gorringe View Post
    Am I barking up the wrong tree in trying to use a compensating
    developer to improve highlight seperation; will they generally just
    reduce the overall contrast of the neg? Thanks very much, Matt.
    Compensation is a local reduction in what otherwise could
    be overly dense areas of the negative. You've mentioned
    single bath as well as two bath methods of attaining
    compensation. In either case local depletion of the
    developer and the local generation of reduction
    byproducts are the operative factors.

    It follows that the greater the depletion relative to the
    less dense areas and the greater the retardent effect of
    the byproducts, the greater the compensation. Dan

  6. #16
    Matthew Gorringe's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by df cardwell View Post
    Since it already is giving a linear resul (input = output), it seems impossible to increase the slope of the highlights without increasing the scale of the film. Using a two bath developer could give you a shoulder, which compresses the highlights, rather than separate them.
    Yes, this is what I was thinking about re barking up the wrong tree and what I think Dan was alluding to. Compensation in developing might also mean compression.

    I wonder if I shouldn't try continuous/rotary agitation with Xtol 1:2. The constant supply of developer would encouage the curve to sweep upwards in the highlights. I have some leeway in printing to go much softer before even considering water baths so maybe this is one good possibility, I'll include it in my tests.

    Thanks for your thoughts everyone.
    Matt Gorringe

  7. #17
    df cardwell's Avatar
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    Compensation in developing might also mean compression.

    No, Compensation = Compressed Highlights !

    To raise the highlights without raising the shadows, you have reduce the exposure. The combination of XTOL and TMY will raise the shadows VERY effectively. Rotary processing will tend to raise the highlights, but without reducing the exposure will not do what you need.

    Attached are to sets of curves for Xtol + TMY from Kodak Germany. The exact times may no longer be exact, but the curve shapes will be VERY close.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails xtol+TMY curves.jpg  

  8. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by Matthew Gorringe View Post
    Yes, this is what I was thinking about re barking up the
    wrong tree and what I think Dan was alluding to.
    Compensation in developing might also mean
    compression.
    It does mean compression. And a good thing it does. Another
    often used means of compression is under development; N-1,
    N-2, etc. An alternative is the use of an appropriate filter at
    the time of taking the photo. All in all staying away from
    blown highlights.

    The density range of film is Much greater than any paper's
    ability to capture. If using a low contrast film on foggy
    days, then expansion may be in order. Dan

  9. #19
    Harry Lime's Avatar
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    What speed are you rating TMY-2 at? 400? 800?

    HL

  10. #20

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    Quote Originally Posted by Harry Lime View Post
    What speed are you rating TMY-2 at? 400? 800?

    HL
    I rate TMY-2 at 400 developed in Pyrocat
    Tom Hoskinson
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    Everything is analog - even digital :D

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