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  1. #21
    Murray@uptowngallery's Avatar
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    I don't know but would think that IV fluids are pretty close to neutral pH, at least compared to developers...
    Murray

  2. #22

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    Getting the fruit juice smell out of the bottle is easy. Fill the bottle with an ounce (24 ml.) of chlorine bleach and the rest water. Let it sit for an hour or so on its side, drain and rinse. Done.
    Frank Schifano

  3. #23
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    Simple is better. I stick to 1 liter bottles for chemicals like my Zone VI print developer that require mixing a stock solution. I use one shot dilute stop bath mixed fresh for each session. If you re-use fixer, perhaps half-gallon bottles would be better. I don't re-use PermaWash or PhotoFlo. I do keep some stock bleach solution in a storage bottle.

    If you are using TMAX 100 film, why not use TMAX RS developer? Just mix the part B that comes in the attached foil packet into the main bottle, and use the contents as a stock solution. I typically dilute from the original bottle 1:9, sometimes 1:4 and it works very well.

    I went through a phase of figuring out storage bottles, then switching to better storage bottles, then wondering about buying glass marbles to keep the air out, then thinking of the best way to label the bottles, then getting rid of most of them. They take up a lot of room, require periodic cleaning, etc. The fewer the better.
    Jerold Harter MD

  4. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by rpohagan View Post
    Should I just sink the money into buying all 1 gallon brown containers or is there an easier way to do this? Thanks for the help!
    My 2c:
    Glass: chemically the best but doesn't bounce when you drop it;
    Plastic bottles sold specifically for photochemistry: good but pricey;
    Plastic bottles sold with photochemistry IN then reused: good & cheap;
    Plastic food bottles: I wouldn't use on principle; they're for food not chemicals I dn't like to mix the containers just in case;
    Plastic bottles for domestic cleaners: can be good & cheap, e.g. bleach (Javex), in Canada at least, comes in 4L/1gal size plastic jugs, just rinse out until the chlorine smell is gone and use for your 1 gal of D76 stock solution.

  5. #25

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    Quote Originally Posted by DaveOttawa View Post
    My 2c:
    Glass: chemically the best but doesn't bounce when you drop
    You can alway buy amber safety coated glass bottles. When drop there isn't any leakage. The plastic coating contains the liquid and glass.

  6. #26

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    Quote Originally Posted by fotch View Post
    ... rather than large jugs ... I decant the gal. into 250ML
    glass amber large mouth bottles, fill to the brim, place a
    small square of saran wrap (for extra protection from air)
    and put the cap on.
    I've quite a number of amber glass Boston Rounds. For the
    storage of chemistry they are standard lab ware. Costs
    are low. A variety of caps are available. The Polyseal
    or Polycone caps are likely as sure a seal as can
    be found.

    One shot is a good idea. That gallon of D76 could go
    into 4 one liter bottles. I'd then split one of those into
    4, 1/4 liter bottles. One of those and an equal amount
    of water equals 1/2 liter of 1:1 D-76. D-76 can and is
    used even more dilute. Dan

  7. #27
    bowzart's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jeroldharter View Post
    I went through a phase of figuring out storage bottles, then switching to better storage bottles, then wondering about buying glass marbles to keep the air out, then thinking of the best way to label the bottles, then getting rid of most of them. They take up a lot of room, require periodic cleaning, etc. The fewer the better.
    Just find someone who likes to drink cheap boxed wine - or drink it yourself. I have kept color developers for years, with no deterioration - in the boxes. I am presently using a b&w developer that I mixed in 2000! No deterioration at all.

    The best ones are the ones that have the silver mylar bags inside. Mix enough chemical to completely fill the bag, and then, the very little air that's contained in the crevices and wrinkles will quickly destroy an infinitesimal amount of the chemical, and that is where the deterioration stops.

    Unfortunately, my taste in wine makes these boxes harder to find. They make pretty good boxed wines now, drinkable, at least, but the best bags are from the cheapest ones, which are disgusting. Why? I dunno.

    So your developer smells like grape juice? Run controls. If it doesn't show, so much the better. I vastly prefer grape juice to say, ammonium hypo!

  8. #28

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    What was that old song? "Let's get heretical?" Oh, "physical?"

    1. The only difficulty in using portions of bagged dry chemicals is proportioning correctly. The possibility of getting too much or too little of a particular component borders on the close to impossible. Think about it: How did Kodak get all that stuff, in proper amounts into your little yellow sack? They mixed up bags of sulfite and whatever in the official Kodak cement mixer, stirred for a long time, and then apportioned by volume into the little envelope you bought. OK, I'm guessing that's what they do, but I'd be surprised to find out that the process is substantially different. When you divide your gallon of D-76 developer into four portions, you are just continuing a fine tradition.

    2. If you have the space, freeze it. It works fine. I've done it with C-41 chemicals besides D-76. Nary a problem. And if there was one, it was a lot smaller than oxidation!

    3. Food and drink containers work fine. I don't understand the reticence. Remove food labels for safety. I like the 1 qt milk bottles, very compact. I noticed yesterday that Gatorade bottles have a fairly wide mouth.

  9. #29
    fotch's Avatar
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    I would think the different chemicals have different weights and the heaviest would settle to the bottom so in spooning out some, you change the formula.

    If you going to all this trouble, would it not be better to mix from scratch?

    Or mix the whole package and decant into smaller bottles without air?

    Film cost more than the chemicals so why risk it?

    Maybe something you really wanted gets spoiled or you get poor results and you think its you rather than the chemicals you just altered

    Penny wise, pound foolish IMHO.
    Items for sale or trade at www.Camera35.com

  10. #30

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    Quote Originally Posted by fotch View Post
    I would think the different chemicals have different weights and the heaviest would settle to the bottom so in spooning out some, you change the formula.
    Solid chemicals don't move around relative one to another, you may have noticed. And presuming they did, there is an ancient technique to correct this, commonly known as "stirring."

    I'm not advocating this, I'm just saying it's not a big deal if someone, somewhere wants to do it. There are a LOT of opinions about practices and procedures here and the funny thing is, most people's work for them regardless of what others may think.

    I mix everything from scratch, so it doesn't concern my own practices.

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