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  1. #11

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    SRS, the formula for D2D can be found in Anchell's "Darkroom Cookbook". I find it to be a very useful dev as it gives you three choices of "B". DO NOT use an acid stop bath with the carbonate "B" bath; you'll get blisters all over the film from the acid/carbonate reaction. A water rinse will do nicely and an alkaline fix is probably a good idea, too.

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by jim appleyard View Post
    DO NOT use an acid stop bath with the carbonate "B" bath; you'll get blisters all over the film from the acid/carbonate reaction. A water rinse will do nicely and an alkaline fix is probably a good idea, too.
    If you have a properly hardened modern film you will NOT get blisters if you use a stop bath!

    Kodak, Ilford, Fuji and a number of other companies make films that will take a stop bath just fine.

    PE

  3. #13

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    Ah, but I did! I was using FP-4 will D2D and an acid stop bath. I ruined 2 rolls this way with big, fat blisters. I then re-read the section on D2D and Anchell clearly states to not use an acid stop. On the next roll I used a water stop and had no blisters. Maybe an acid stop is not supposed to damage film, but mine came out that way. Don't know what else to tell you.
    Last edited by jim appleyard; 08-15-2008 at 06:46 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  4. #14
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    I'll have to check that one out then. I've never heard of a problem since the 60s with any Kodak, Ilford, Fuji or Agfa film.

    PE

  5. #15

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    You don't NEED a stop bath with a true DD

    Quote Originally Posted by jim appleyard View Post
    SRS, the formula for D2D can be found in Anchell's "Darkroom Cookbook". I find it to be a very useful dev as it gives you three choices of "B". DO NOT use an acid stop bath with the carbonate "B" bath; you'll get blisters all over the film from the acid/carbonate reaction. A water rinse will do nicely and an alkaline fix is probably a good idea, too.
    If properly formulated and processed, a DD has, well, stopped developing after Bath B.

    If you need a stop bath, something is wrong.

    Just wash a bit to remove developing agents and move to the fixer.

  6. #16

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    I need to correct my post: Anchell states that the "film SHOULD be rinsed in a stop bath". IDK where I read about the carbonate/acid reaction, but I can assure you, it does happen.

    PE, I don't doubt your word. You know far, far more about these things than I do, but perhaps it only happens with D2D or other devs with a high carbonate content??? D2D contains 30g/liter of carbonate; a fairly high amount IMO. There are few other devs in the "Cookbook" that contain more carbonate.

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    I've worked at the 50 - 100 g/l of Sodium Carbonate with no problem. Sure does fizz with FB paper, but the film is ok in that type of situation. In fact, a case in point, the C-41 developer is about 50 g/l carbonate and C-41 films are thick and processed at 100 F (40C). Even so, you can use a stop bath with them with no problem.

    Some softening agents can reverse hardness, but I doubt there are any in this developer. I know of one softener that can be used in some situations that will instantly reticulate film.

    PE

  8. #18

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    Interesting. I used city tap water, Kodak Indicator stop and D2D. Maybe the planets were aligned wrong?

  9. #19

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    30 g/l of carbonate

    Quote Originally Posted by jim appleyard View Post
    I need to correct my post: Anchell states that the "film SHOULD be rinsed in a stop bath". IDK where I read about the carbonate/acid reaction, but I can assure you, it does happen.

    PE, I don't doubt your word. You know far, far more about these things than I do, but perhaps it only happens with D2D or other devs with a high carbonate content??? D2D contains 30g/liter of carbonate; a fairly high amount IMO. There are few other devs in the "Cookbook" that contain more carbonate.
    ...is not much more pH than 5 or 10. Five will give you a pH of about 10.5, but even 90 grams won't hit pH 11. Carbonate really flattens out near the top of the quantity per liter graph.

  10. #20
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    Yes it does Paul, but the buffer capacity continues to rise!

    Don't forget that, as buffer capacity is very very important to all of this.

    PE

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