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  1. #21

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ian Grant View Post
    If you had a relatively soft emulsion then squeegeeing
    could easily cause a major problem, such as described.
    Certainly if you put a squeegee anywhere near EFKE
    films you'd have problems. Ian
    How about 1950s Adox? Or a few other films from
    that era? I've ALWAYS squeegeed roll films. With
    today's hardened emulsions there is even more
    assurance that squeegeeing is safe. Buy the
    eight blade; great design. Be sure to keep
    it clean. Dan

  2. #22
    Ian Grant's Avatar
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    1950's German Adox was the same as 1970's EFKE ADOX, extremely soft.

    Modern Adox is slightly better but use a squeegee with it and you'll damage it.

    Ian

  3. #23

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    The smallest of life's simple pleasures

    Quote Originally Posted by dancqu View Post
    How about 1950s Adox? Or a few other films from
    that era? I've ALWAYS squeegeed roll films. With
    today's hardened emulsions there is even more
    assurance that squeegeeing is safe. Buy the
    eight blade; great design. Be sure to keep
    it clean. Dan
    To be fair, I do not think it is the squegee, sponge or cloth that is the real problem...

    A lot of film has been so treated without problems.

    I think the trouble is with dust, grit or other solid particle(s)
    getting lodged between the soft film (no matter how hard it is!) and
    the person doing the drying.

    Yes you can do it with out scratching the film,
    but I/we/many prefer just letting the liquid flow off naturally...
    I have seen dust (even grains of sand) get stuck in those squeegee blades...
    a lot depends on how you store them when they are not in use.

    Squeegeeing (prints at least) is actually sort of fun and
    strangely rewarding for someone who is thrilled by the smallest of life's simple pleasures!

  4. #24
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    Use photoflo. Don't squeegee. After the negs are dry, curt and sleeve them and put them under a book.

    Ask yourself why you need to squeegee film, what is the benefit, really? If you use a wetting agent there is no compelling reason to run anything physically against and possibly abrasive to a wet and therefore fragile emulsion. Sqeegeeing is an outdated carryover from the really olden days.

  5. #25

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    Quote Originally Posted by JBrunner View Post
    Ask yourself why you need to squeegee film, what is the benefit, really? If you use a wetting agent there is no compelling reason to run anything physically against and possibly abrasive to a wet and therefore fragile emulsion. Sqeegeeing is an outdated carryover from the really olden days.
    When I first started (not that long ago -- 2005 or thereabouts), I couldn't get film to dry without drying marks unless I squeegeed, so there was a real benefit. Now I no longer have that problem, I believe because I've cut the amount of concentrated Photo Flo I use from the recommended dilution to twice as dilute (half the concentrate in a liter of water). Peoples' experiences on this point seem to vary an awful lot, so it's hard to give a single procedure that works for everybody -- variables like the water supply, brand of wetting agent, and perhaps even environmental factors seem to greatly affect results.

  6. #26

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    A Cleaner Film Surface

    Quote Originally Posted by Ray Rogers View Post
    To be fair, I do not think it is the squegee,
    sponge or cloth that is the real problem... A lot of film
    has been so treated without problems.

    I think the trouble is with dust, grit or other solid particle(s)

    Squeegeeing (prints at least) is actually sort of fun ...
    With surface water removed film dries FAST. There is
    less chance of dust or lint settling upon it's surface and
    then staying there. A wet surface is a magnet for any
    statically charged air born particles. Also, surface
    water left to slowly drain and evaporate is an
    invitation for water spots.

    Of course bladed or sponge squeegees must be kept
    clean. I use a distilled water half strength Photo Flo last
    rinse in which the eight blade is given a rinse as well.
    I've tried water only but the blades tend to 'hang'
    as the squeegee is pulled slowly one time the
    full length of the film.

    Squeegee prints? I sponge dry prints. If I had one
    of those sloping backboards at a sink I might consider
    squeegeeing. Sponge drying though does work well.
    A sponge will draw water from a surface. Photo
    grade sponges are still available. Dan

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