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  1. #11
    Photo Engineer's Avatar
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    For those interested, grade 2 is a paper with a mid scale straight line slope of about 2.5 and the other grades fall on either side. FWIW.

    PE

  2. #12

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    A couple of minor notes. First, modern negatives are often processed to somewhat lower contrast, and grade 3 paper often works well with them. Second, paper grades are not uniform from one manufacturer to another. One maker's grade 3 may have either more or less contrast than another's. Think of the numbers as showing relative contrast, with higher numbers being more contrasty and lower numbers being less. A good part of getting your darkroom skills honed is being able to decide what grade of paper to print on - what contrast is right. To do that, you will need to print many pictures on more than one grade. Variable contrast (VC) papers are very good (and economical) for that, but you will need to get filters if your enlarger doesn't have a dichroic head.

  3. #13
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    Nworth;

    Way back in the 40s, I learned from many photo books that enlarged prints required a grade 3 paper to achieve a grade 2 print due to enlarger flare. When I went to Kodak I questioned this and they verified it to me and then had me "prove" this hypothesis.

    So, a contact paper of grade 2 is not an enlarger grade 2 in terms of result. This is a general case of 2 = 3 for contact vs enlarged. Flare counts. But a strict grade 2 with no flare is about 2.5 in mid scale tones.

    Modern and old negatives (back to the 60s) were processed in developers that yielded a negative contrast of about 0.6 for professional products and about 0.65 - 0.7 for consumer products. Again, due to flare in cheaper lenses.

    PE

  4. #14
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    Check where you buy your supplies. This time of year, back to school, Ilford and I think Kodak offer a 25 sheet pack of VCRC 8x10 paper with two rolls of film for the price of the paper. The vendors want to get you to try film and paper. It should cut your costs and help to make you feel comfortable experimenting. Experimenting, trial and error, is how you learn to make better prints.

    Enjoy,
    John Powers

  5. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Photo Engineer View Post
    Nworth;

    Way back in the 40s, I learned from many photo books that enlarged prints required a grade 3 paper to achieve a grade 2 print due to enlarger flare. When I went to Kodak I questioned this and they verified it to me and then had me "prove" this hypothesis.
    Interesting to learn of the one-grade drop with the old non-coated enlarger lenses. The topic of "vintage enlarger lenses" occasionally comes up on these forums and the concept is usually 'poo pooed' as not producing any effect that would be desirable. I like to keep an open mind, and if photographers from that era were projection printing with non-coated lenses, that certainly would be an influential element in their tonal reproduction path.

  6. #16

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    Dear Brofkand,

    PM me your home address and I will send you a MULTIGRADE printing manual. This should explain everything and save you some dollars.

    Simon ILFORD photo / HARMAN technology Limited :

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