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  1. #11
    David A. Goldfarb's Avatar
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    The Albright article linked above is certainly interesting. I'd like to read more from other sources before deciding to give up on glassines, but it has me thinking.
    flickr--http://www.flickr.com/photos/davidagoldfarb/
    Photography (not as up to date as the flickr site)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com/photo
    Academic (Slavic and Comparative Literature)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com

  2. #12
    Thomas Bertilsson's Avatar
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    I would look up curatorial staff at art museums to find out what they use. Be just as interesting as Albright's article, especially if they have a sizable collection.
    - thomas
    "Often moments come looking for us". - Robert Frank

    "Make good art!" - Neil Gaiman

    "...the heart and mind are the true lens of the camera". - Yousuf Karsh

  3. #13
    Vaughn's Avatar
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    FWIW, I have been told to keep the emulsion side of the neg away from the glue used to seal the glassine envelopes.

    Vaughn
    At least with LF landscape, a bad day of photography can still be a good day of exercise.

  4. #14

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    Glassine is an archival no-no. All our negatives at the Oregon Historical Society are resleeved in simple archival paper negative sleeves. Write any info on the sleeve in pencil. The source is Metal Edge.

    http://www.metaledgeinc.com/

    Peter Gomena

  5. #15

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    ^^^
    Peter - I don't doubt your opinion, but Googling "glassine" produces a lot of information concerning "archival" glassine, which seems accepted and used by many responsible conservators.

    I have negs from my late Father which have been in glassine since the early 1950's. He was also a keen philatelist and I have covers and mint postage stamps in glassine from the same period.

    In any event, I really would not rely on some of the polythene and plastic storage products which have been marketed in recent years. Proper acid-free paper is a much better option and has been proven....the "simple" solution which you use.

  6. #16
    reellis67's Avatar
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    "Many commercially available enclosures are labeled "archival" or "acid-free". However, some of these same items may contain lignin, dyes, sizing agents, coatings, plasticizers, or other harmful additives. Never use enclosures made from unprocessed woodpulp paper, glassine, or polyvinyl chloride (PVC) to house or store photographs. Avoid products made from colored papers because they often contain dyes or inks that are unstable and will migrate or bleed onto photographs or otherwise adversely affect the photographs stored within. For an enclosure material to be completely safe it must meet or exceed the specifications in the latest revision of ISO 18902 including the Photographic Activity Test (PAT) ISO 18916. Purchase enclosure materials from a reputable supplier. "

    from http://www.loc.gov/preserv/care/photolea.html

    "The museum lost 1/2 its unmounted glossy photographs because their glassine envelopes cockled: this underlines the need for correct storage in the first place."

    Harrison, A W. (1979). Conservation of library materials [clip no. 10]. APLA Bulletin; 43 (1) July 79, 7, 43(1)

    - Randy

  7. #17
    Barry S's Avatar
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    My oldest negatives were stored in glassine sleeves and I remember reading that glassine wasn't considered archival, so I switched to polypropylene sometime in the early 80's. The older glassine stored negatives date from the 70's and in some cases the glassine developed splotchy brown spots, some overall darkening, and some rippling. Maybe some glassine is better, but I wouldn't trust it.

  8. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by David A. Goldfarb View Post
    The Albright article linked above is certainly interesting. I'd like to read more from other sources before deciding to give up on glassines, but it has me thinking.
    Read Chapters 13 and 14 of Wilhelm:

    http://www.wilhelm-research.com/book_toc.html

    If you have limited time, start with page 502. Unless you have no interest in passing things down to your progeny, dump the glassine!

  9. #19
    David A. Goldfarb's Avatar
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    Here are a few more citations:

    A posting from a conservator generally agreeing with the Albright article--

    http://palimpsest.stanford.edu/cdl/1998/0366.html

    A posting from a publisher challenging views like the one above--

    http://palimpsest.stanford.edu/cdl/1998/0409.html

    A description of a project for preserving printed illustrations in glassine envelopes (pro-glassine, but not about photographs)--

    http://aic.stanford.edu/sg/bpg/annual/v18/bp18-14.html

    I found another post from Luis Nadeau suggesting that cyanotype images hold up better in acid paper, and can fade in alkaline buffered paper. Of course the paper base might not do so well in acid paper.

    So it seems like there's enough doubt that I will look into other options that function like glassine sleeves. I don't like file pages or binders or the kind of soft plastic that adheres to negatives. It's about time for a major reorganization at some point, since I have negs from different periods organized in a couple of different ways, and that would be a good opportunity to re-sleeve and do some re-proofing along the way to standardize things a bit more.
    flickr--http://www.flickr.com/photos/davidagoldfarb/
    Photography (not as up to date as the flickr site)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com/photo
    Academic (Slavic and Comparative Literature)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com

  10. #20
    Vaughn's Avatar
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    I use 4-fold (no glue) paper envelopes found here...

    http://www.conservationresources.com...ection5_05.htm

    ...for all my sheet film. Since the envelopes open completely, there is no sliding of the neg to get it out. The disadvantage is that they must be unfolded to see the neg...this is somewhat offset by the ability to write in pencil on the envelope to identify what is inside. I double and triple up the negs in the envelopes if they are copies or close to copies of the same image...with similar paper inbetween the negs.

    Vaughn

    PS...David, if you have any questions, or would like a sample, let me know. (I have no other connection to the company other than using their products.)
    At least with LF landscape, a bad day of photography can still be a good day of exercise.

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