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  1. #11
    Nicholas Lindan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Poohblah View Post
    Photo Flo and no hypo clear. my rolls of Tri-X 400 really like to get watermarks
    If you are using the school chems then the likely culprit is that the PhotoFlo has crud in it. Photo Flo will support bacterial growth, and then there is just the usual load of dirt, fluff and crud each roll brings to the communal jug.

    You may also be picking up more crud in the other processing solutions. If you are picking up a bit of oil or grease on the way then problems will get compounded.

    Mix up a new batch of rinse for each roll(s) using distilled water and discard after use.

    I pre-dilute Photo Flo 1:20 with 95% isopropyl alcohol (add 3/4 oz Photo Flo to a 1 pint bottle of alcohol) and then dilute it again at 1:20 with distilled water just before use. The end result is using it at about 1/2 strength but the 5% alcohol in the final rinse adds a small amount to the sheeting action and so the action comes out about the same. Soak the film for about a minute. As mentioned by another poster, after hanging the film I wet my fingers in the rinse and gently squeegee the excess water off the film.

    The film should appear uniformly damp. There should be absolutely no beading. If there is then return to the Photo Flo for a longer soak.

    No spots - guaranteed - or amount charged for advice will be cheerfully refunded.
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  2. #12
    Ian Grant's Avatar
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    The problem is usually far worse with hard water, photoflo/wetting agent doesn't really do anything to cure the problem. I solved it by always removing all the water from the non-emulsion side of 35mm film using absorbent paper kitchen towelling. That's worked perfectly for me for years.

    Ian

  3. #13

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    Like some others, I use Photo Flo at greater-than-recommended dilution. Specifically, I use it diluted 1:400 rather than the 1:200 that the bottle recommends. I also dilute it in distilled water, not tap water. Do not agitate film in Photo Flo (at least, not inversion agitation); that produces foaming. I rap the tank a few times and rotate it a bit. One more point: I dunk my film in Photo Flow for 30 seconds, no more. Longer tends to produce drying marks.

  4. #14
    BradS's Avatar
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    I've used Tri-X and PhotoFlo for years. I always mix fresh PhotoFlo for each developing session. Like others, I dilute it about 1:500 with tap water (we have very hard water here) and use the finger squeege technique. Never a problem.

  5. #15
    Double Negative's Avatar
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    I never liked Photo Flo. I use Heico Perma Wash followed by ten minutes of rinse. Once complete I let the tank fill with water and put a drop of LFN Wetting Agent in and let it sit for a minute - then hang to dry. Never had spots in twenty plus years.

  6. #16
    Stuggi's Avatar
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    Try the Ilford washing method with a drop of washing-up liquid in the last stage, then squeegee the film with your fingers to remove the foam. Works every time for me.
    Canon F1n / FTb / AE-1P | Yashica Mat-124G | Hasselblad 500C/M | Leica IIIf

  7. #17
    Poohblah's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mike Kennedy View Post
    Hope you squeegee your negs. before hanging them up to dry.Use fingers moistened with photoflo and clamp them together to rid the negs of excess liquid.
    Never use commercial squeegee's on film (an old APUG tip).
    yes, i use the finger squeegee technique.

    as for other films, i've been using ilford HP5+ and Pan 50 and various Arista brand films. no problems with photo flo with them, in fact with those films i have to use photo flo or else my negatives collect more dust than a vacuum cleaner.

    thanks for the tips, i'll see if teach will let me mix my own, dilute photo flo because i don't want to mess with the chemicals every one else is using. i'll also try some hypo, i've heard a lot about it but i've never bothered to use it.

    also... do you think i should use distilled water? here where i live, the tap water is purer than bottled water, but distilled water is obviously purest...

  8. #18

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    Photo-Flo and bubbles.

    1. Recently, I've wrecked a couple of films by frothing my Photo-Flo. the bubbles dried into spots. No more of this. Mike - thanks for the idea of squeegeeing with wet fingers.

    2. Roger Hicks suggests hanging the film on a slope, so the water runs over to one edge, where any water-spots won't matter. Also, the water runs off more efficiently when concentrated to one edge.

  9. #19

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mike Kennedy View Post
    Never use commercial squeegee's on film (an old APUG tip).
    Well I'm an old APUGer and I recommend the use of a
    film squeege. I used for years a cheap Yankee sponge
    squeegee but for the last few years have used a very
    nicely engineered eight blade; Jobo by brand but
    available under other names. Film drys fast. Dan

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