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Thread: Film Disaster!

  1. #1

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    Film Disaster!

    I've just developed my second 120 film and made a huge faux pas/cock up.
    I only put slightly more developer mix than what's needed to develop a 35mm film in the tank. I had a bit of a 'blank brain' moment and got the quantity wrong.
    Conesquently, the images are 7/8 developed and 1/8 under developed - is there any way of rescuing it???
    Wouldn't be so bad but there's a couple of 'top' pic's on there where all the elements came together just at the right time.

  2. #2
    keithwms's Avatar
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    I don't quite understand what you mean by 7/8 and 1/8. Are you saying that all of the images have an underdeveloped region to one side because you didn't fill up the tank enough?

    If so then the first thing is to pour yourself a tall, neat glass of scotch.

    Assuming that you didn't provide enough developer and got a thin band to one side, then I think the main options, in terms of wet processing, are to use a reducer to try to reconcile the thicker portion with the thinner; or conversely, to try to build a bit more density into the thin parts with KRST. But I doubt that either method is going to equalize the two portions in a contrast-consistent way and it's going to be hard to snatch fromt he treatment at the right time. So I'd be inclined to consider (1) creative cropping, (2) dodge and burn in printing or after scanning the negs and working in photoshop....

    Of course you might just print them and see if dodge & burn is sufficient. If you print in such a way that the thinner highlights are at the edge of your paper curve then maybe you won't see that much difference.

    (Again this is assuming that I understand what you are saying...)
    "Only dead fish follow the stream"

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  3. #3

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    Thanks Keith, yes you did understand correctly - I thought as much but I was hoping in vain that there was a 'magic trick' someone had up their sleeve.

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    Tall neat glass of scotch.

    Then, tomorrow, when its effects have worn off, get into the darkroom and try to print. I have a film where I think what I did was only 7/8 fill with the stop and have an edge that is overdeveloped. With a bit of burning it was good enough that I sent it out as my print exchange print last time and everyone said they loved the print and no-one noticed an edge. Being a straight line it is actually quite easy to burn/dodge to hide quite a lot.

    But no, sorry, I'm not aware of anything you can do to rectify the negative.

    Hywel

  5. #5
    CBG
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    A multi step technical sequenced job like developing needs to be seen as a process one learns bit by bit. I think you get to do some number of mistakes and then things do get much better.

    Take notes and be methodical. Seriously, write out the steps in detail. Document times, temperatures, agitation etc. If you write it out in the beginning you'll train yourself in an approach that will yield you good consistent results with less headaches and wasted effort.

    Try to see the first few rolls as learning tools to create your own very consistent, repeatable process. As you do it more, you'll be making way fewer errors.

    C

  6. #6
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    Emanded,
    Had I had this problem, I would not have considered reduction of the properly developed part. Since you have some image, selective negative intensification might do it. Chromium Insensifier comes to mind. I have also heard of using selenium toner to intensify a negative. Putting the neg strip back on the reel and putting it in a dish or tray of intensifier--glass, perhaps, so you can see the exact level of the solution??
    John, Mount Vernon, Virginia USA

  7. #7
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    Just print the bottom half.

  8. #8
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    I think Hywel and Eric have the only two practical options, however you print.

    Stuff happens however careful you are but being careful does reduce the number of times it happens...

    Good luck, Bob.

  9. #9

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    Just pouring the scotch!
    I've now got BIG numbers on my wall to guide me in future.
    Thanks

  10. #10
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    Pour the scotch - then print the bottom half
    My photos are always without all that distracting color ...



 

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