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  1. #41

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    Doug,

    I think that the chart you were referring to is for Fortepan 400 using a 2:2:100 dilution. To print with AZO I believe a 1:1:100 dilution for developing the negative is recommended. Unfortunately, a chart with Fortepan 400 using 1:1:100 is not included. However, if you scroll further down and look at the Ilford HP5 chart with 1:1:100 dilution, you will see that a CI of 0.7 to 0.75 corresponds to roughly 16 mins (not that Fortepan 400 and HP5 are the same but it is close enough I would think).
    Francesco

  2. #42

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    Doug, I meant to say FP4.
    Francesco

  3. #43

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    Quote Originally Posted by doughowk
    A novice's question - how to read the graphs for individual films on page 4 of your article? For Azo printing, you should aim for a CI (contrast index) of .7 - .75. Figure 11 for Forte 400 would suggest a development time of 8-9 minutes to reach target CI. In earlier comment, though, "your develoment time for Forte 400 is too short. You need at least 14-16 minutes to develop the CI needed for AZO." I'm confused.<br>
    My 15 min dev time for Agfa APX 100 seemed about right judging solely from print results.
    Doug,

    You read the chart correctly, but the only chart included for Forte 400 is one based on UV reading and it is intended is calculating negative development times when printing with alternative processes that use UV light to expose. The charts that end with the word BLUE should be used for silver printing, incluidng AZ0. Unfortunately I have not run any tests of Forte with Blue light so there is no chart in the article that matches Forte to AZO printing. However, by simple comparison to similar high speed films for which Blue light tests were made I determined that about 14-16 of development wold be needed to reach the CI of about .75 needed for AZO.

  4. #44
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    My question concerns development by inspection. The article says folks are using an amber safelight to DBI, as the brown stain is difficult to see with the traditional green safelight. I thought that on this forum or the Azo forum folks said the amber safelight fogs and that a red safelight is the proper one to use.
    What are you DBI folks using?
    juan

  5. #45

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    Quote Originally Posted by Francesco
    Doug,

    I think that the chart you were referring to is for Fortepan 400 using a 2:2:100 dilution. To print with AZO I believe a 1:1:100 dilution for developing the negative is recommended. Unfortunately, a chart with Fortepan 400 using 1:1:100 is not included. However, if you scroll further down and look at the Ilford HP5 chart with 1:1:100 dilution, you will see that a CI of 0.7 to 0.75 corresponds to roughly 16 mins (not that Fortepan 400 and HP5 are the same but it is close enough I would think).
    I think that the 2:2:100 dilution is best for AZO printing with most films, certainly if you are developing for SBR of 7 and below. In the Blue light charts the most similar film to Forte 400 is Ilford HP5+ so I would recommend using these times as a guide for developing Forte.

    Sandy

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  7. #47

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    A little late to the party. I too just shot some 4x5 in a workshop at Mt. Shasta last week, and decided to try PMK in my Unidrum processor. Bought the pre made Photographers Formulary PMK, still all unopened...and now I read that Pyrocat HD is a better choice for rotary processing and VC paper? Just my luck.lol

    Great article Sandy!
    Chris

  8. #48

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    [quote="chrisl"]A little late to the party. I too just shot some 4x5 in a workshop at Mt. Shasta last week, and decided to try PMK in my Unidrum processor. Bought the pre made Photographers Formulary PMK, still all unopened...and now I read that Pyrocat HD is a better choice for rotary processing and VC paper? Just my luck.lol

    Chris,

    Although I believe you will get in the long run more consistent results with Pyrocat-HD than PMK in rotary processing don't discard the PMK. It is an excellet developer and if you follow the same directions I give for rotary processing with Pyrocat-HD you should get good resutls in the Unidrum. The only thing I would add to the instructions would be that the initial pre-soak should be in a slightly alkaline solution for PMK. You could get this by adding about 1/2 of a teaspoonful of sodium carbonate or sodium metaborate per liter of pre-soak water.

  9. #49

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    Sandy

    You mention in your article to mix the Phenidone into a paste with Isoprophyl Alcohol, so I popped into a big pharmacy in the city this morning. I asked for Isoprophyl Alcohol and got some very funny looks and questions about why I wanted it and had to ask the Pharmasist.The reply came back "We don't sell it, maybe you should try at the Car Accessories shop" ???? "OK, do you have any rubbing alcohol instead"? I replied. They sold me a bottle? Go figure


    Phill
    It is not tradition that secures the survival of our craft, its the craft that secures the survival of our traditions.

  10. #50

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    [quote="philldresser"]Sandy

    You mention in your article to mix the Phenidone into a paste with Isoprophyl Alcohol, so I popped into a big pharmacy in the city this morning. I asked for Isoprophyl Alcohol and got some very funny looks and questions about why I wanted it and had to ask the Pharmasist.The reply came back "We don't sell it, maybe you should try at the Car Accessories shop" ???? "OK, do you have any rubbing alcohol instead"? I replied. They sold me a bottle? Go figure


    That is very strange. All of the local Pharmacy stores (CVS, Eckherd, etc.) here in South Carolina have Isopropyl Alcohol on the shelves, clearly marked. I think you can get it in 70% or 91% strength but that makes no difference for the mixing. What I use is a straight 91% Isopropyl Alcohol sold by the quart at CVS. Rubbing alcohol has some extra stuff in there but I think it will not harm the formula.

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