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  1. #21
    Ed Sukach's Avatar
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    [quote="Michael A. Smith" Because of this phenomena, I recently built a cement block freezer.[/quote]

    Why do you want to freeze cement blocks?
    Carpe erratum!!

    Ed Sukach, FFP.

  2. #22

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    Simply amazing.

    A film aging problem has turned into a refrigerator design thread. 8)

    Now I know why I keep coming back to this site.

    "Learning without boundaries"

    :roll:

    Kind Regards,
    Never be afraid to try something new. Remember, amateurs built the ark. Professionals built the Titanic.

  3. #23
    fhovie's Avatar
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    I think what we have here is a failure to understand RF and EMF. A freezer is not a capacitor - it is a wave guide. We have established that a freezer will suck up cosmic rays and I know it wont hold a charge or light my strobes. So - what frequency is YOUR freezer resonant? I have a small chest freezer - I figure somewhere around 500Mhz should be about right. Out here in the desert everyone is on cable - I only use HF myself and have concluded that if the film is stuck between two RF dampening turkeys - it will be ok and that will also lower the q of the waveguide and protect it from all foul radiation. I have noticed a tendency of my film to gobble up more of my time because of this but I will still enjoy this hobby with thanksgiving.
    My photos are always without all that distracting color ...

  4. #24
    Sean's Avatar
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    Hi all, I just got my first box of 8x10 film, 50 sheets of tri-x. I plan to start shooting (worst case scenario in 5 months but hopefully more soon). So what is involved with short term storage within 12 months use. Keep it in the fridge? Am I going to do harm by keeping it in the fridge, removing it, taking out a few sheets, putting it back. The film is set to expire in 2006 and NZ doesn't get very hot so should I not chill the film at all and just store it in a dry closet? With 35mm I used it rather quickly so have never considered how to store a box of sheet film. Thanks for any advice! Sean

  5. #25
    Ole
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    Sean, that's the way I do it: Keep it in the freezer, take out a few sheets after thawing it completely, put the box back in. Norway doesn't tend to get any warmer than New Zealand, but I buy large amounts of film when I cn get any - every few years.

    Don't worry about "cosmic energy"! The reason film gradually deteriorates in cold storage is background radiation, only some of which is cosmic radiation. And none of it is radio frequency "cosmic energy".
    -- Ole Tjugen, Luddite Elitist
    Norway

  6. #26
    Sean's Avatar
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    ok, next question, how long to properly thaw a box of 8x10 film?

    thanks

  7. #27

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    Paul Hamann

  8. #28
    jbj
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    "I figure somewhere around 500Mhz should be about right. "

    Wow, I never knew that I could do high-field nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy without a liquid helium/liquid nitrogen-cooled superconducting magnet. Protons will resonate at ~500Mhz and carbon-13 nuclei will resonate at ~125Mhz in a 500Mhz field. I have an idea for refrigerator/freezer based spectrometer. Now if I could just figure out how to build a probe that fits between my slabs of meat and film I'll be set. And how to somehow Fourier-transform the digitized signals with some leftover turkey....


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