Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 69,735   Posts: 1,515,472   Online: 1082
      
Page 10 of 28 FirstFirst ... 4567891011121314151620 ... LastLast
Results 91 to 100 of 273
  1. #91

    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Willamette Valley, Oregon
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    3,684
    Quote Originally Posted by John W View Post
    Perhaps I'm missing something, but dumping used
    fix seems... counter-productive, especially in a thread
    focused on water-conservation.
    That is the "Down Side" I mentioned in the post to which you
    have referred. A voluminous fixer, very dilute, very little loaded
    with silver, goes down the drain. On the other hand only one fix
    is needed for 'archival' results. Also I've found a stop of any
    sort to be unneeded. For those using a water stop that
    could be a Big savings in water.

    As for silver down the drain I've a mind to solve that problem
    by sulfide or oxidation treatment, or simply allowing the used
    fixer to oxidize. Either way a precipitate will form which can
    then be removed. Dan

  2. #92

    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Seattle, WA
    Shooter
    4x5 Format
    Posts
    124
    Quote Originally Posted by dancqu View Post
    A voluminous fixer, very dilute, very little loaded
    with silver, goes down the drain. On the other hand only one fix
    is needed for 'archival' results. Also I've found a stop of any
    sort to be unneeded. For those using a water stop that
    could be a Big savings in water.
    Ah, thanks for the clarifications. The point about eliminating the stop is interesting. I'm planning on using single-tray processing for larger silver prints when my new darkroom is completed. I have ready access to a silver recovery unit, so I might just use a large drum to store (and partially evaporate?) spent one-shot fix before disposal.

  3. #93

    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Willamette Valley, Oregon
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    3,684
    Quote Originally Posted by John W View Post
    Ah, thanks for the clarifications. The point about eliminating
    the stop is interesting. I'm planning on using single-tray processing
    for larger silver prints when my new darkroom is completed. I have
    ready access to a silver recovery unit, so I might just use a large
    drum to store (and partially evaporate?) spent one-shot
    fix before disposal.
    Four minutes with the slow very dilute sodium thiosulfate fixer
    I use has them clean. Not bad IMO considering no stop and only
    one fix needed to guarantee 'archival' results. The ph neutral fix
    is fresh each print or few at same time processed.

    Also the developer is used very dilute. Were it Dektol 1:7.
    So carry forward of developer is minimal and into
    a neutral fix. Dan

  4. #94

    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    USA
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    17
    Quote Originally Posted by Photo Engineer View Post
    Just FYI, Bill Troop and I are working on a new type of fixer which should allow a shorter wash cycle for film and paper than any other fixer now on the market for B&W products.

    PE
    Oy! Ok, this refers back to the answer you gave me on another thread (the house brands vs. named) regarding Kodak fixers with hardeners. I figured I'd come over here to pursue it because it'd be more on topic here on this thread.

    From what I understand, the hardener component will add to wash times. So, by using a fixer that doesn't have a hardener, you do not need to wash as long. Kodak, currently, doesn't sell a non-hardening fixer from what I can see.
    So, what I'm asking is, in the meantime while you guys are coming out with that new fixer (Kodak?), we could use a non-hardening fixer to save water and if we add in some sort of hypo clear product, we can save even more? That's assuming a product that doesn't need the hardener, of course.

  5. #95
    Photo Engineer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Rochester, NY
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    22,869
    Images
    65
    The hardener in Kodak fix is optional and comes in a separate bottle with mixing instructions for use either way. The only way to determine proper fix and wash is by testing with test solutions after using your normal work flow. As to whether you need the hardener or not, that again is up to you to determine, based on the films and papers you use.

    I never use any hypo eliminator or wash aid and I always test just fine. I think they are only useful when the water type or amount are the limiting factors- in other words they are extreme remedies for limited water or bad (hard) water.

    PE

  6. #96

    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    USA
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    17
    Quote Originally Posted by Photo Engineer View Post
    The hardener in Kodak fix is optional and comes in a separate bottle with mixing instructions for use either way.
    PE
    I am very confused right now.

    I'm am looking at a bottle of Kodafix solution and right below the name it says "A Fast-Acting Hardening Fixer for Films, Plates, and Papers."

    And this product http://www.freestylephoto.biz/197174...lon?cat_id=303 shows that it's a hardening fixer and I don't have the envelope anymore, but it did say that it is a hardening fixer on the package.

    And the Kodak Rapid Fixer also says it's hardening.

    These are the only Kodak fixers I see, at least marketed to B&W folks, and all of them are hardening. Now the Kodak Flexicolor Fixer / Replenisher doesn't have anything that says it's hardening from the descriptions that I've seen. Is that the product you're referring to? ( I have seen posts from folks who use this to fix their B&W film and paper.)

    Is there another Kodak product that I'm not seeing?
    Last edited by JustDave; 04-02-2009 at 01:34 PM. Click to view previous post history. Reason: Oy! all of them are hardening, D'Oh!

  7. #97
    trexx's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Tucson
    Shooter
    4x5 Format
    Posts
    299
    Blog Entries
    1
    Images
    1
    Both
    http://www.freestylephoto.biz/146411...lon?cat_id=303
    http://www.freestylephoto.biz/146410...lon?cat_id=303
    Have the hardener in a separate container and is optional. So optional I do not think I have ever seen it used.
    D-76 is a standard developer, although not one I use.
    Ansel Adams - The Negative

  8. #98
    Photo Engineer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Rochester, NY
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    22,869
    Images
    65
    I think that I have to agree with Trexx! However, I do use the hardener for my own hand coatings as I know that my home made coatings are softer than production runs.

    My Kodak fixer is packed like the second reference in a cardboard box with a jug and a bottle. It says use of the bottle of hardener/acid is optional and gives 2 sets of mixing instructions. The jug has a neat inset in the handle where the bottle of hardener is held during shipping.

    PE

  9. #99
    michael9793's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Fort Myers, Florida, USA
    Shooter
    ULarge Format
    Posts
    2,000
    Images
    111
    lets make it easy
    Perma wash
    1 min wash 1 min perma wash and one min wash. Prints 5min wash 5 min perma wash then 5 min wash.
    save on water
    "Capturing an image is only one step of the long chain of events to create a beautiful Photograph” See my updated website: mandersenphotography.com

  10. #100
    IloveTLRs's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Switzerland
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    996
    Images
    2
    When I wash my negatives for the last step (dev > stop > fix > 1 min wash > Fuji QuickWash > 5 min wash) I rinse them on the reel under running water quickly, then let them sit in a tank of water for 5 minutes (no running water.) So far I've had no problems



 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin