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  1. #121

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    Question to all,
    1, Method for B & W Films in Jobo tanks 2500 series,
    2, Method for C41 Films in same tanks
    3, Method for B & W prints (Resin coated)
    4, Method for RA4 prints. (Kodak Endura & Fuji CA)

    I use about 8 water changes with rotary agitation to both types of films, I then put a slow running hose in to the tank neck but only fairly briefly.
    The whole process taking about 10 minutes.
    Is the above any good?
    I hand wash B & W prints and RA4 under a tempered water supply with a light cloth rub to remove the surface Blix of fixer. I then put in to a tank of about 2 gallon capacity with an agitation pump which moves the water vigourously. Prints remain in this second tank for 4 to 10 mins depending on darkroom load and activity.
    I then hand wash under tempered water for another 20 to 30 seconds. I put RA4 prints in to a print stabilizer brightener for 20 to 120 secs.
    Q, Is this any good?
    Q, Does print brightener stabilizer work for B& W prints?
    I know my method is a bit hap hazard as I carry out these washing and water changing activities while waiting for the next print to emerge from the Printo or fix bath. I have never seen fading on any of my prints or films since I started home developing 10 years ago but who am I to say this is Archival when Kodak claims 80 year stability for Endura papers and B & W prints should have a massive lifespan?

    Really would like the opinions of APUGers on my process.

    Richard

  2. #122

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    The lab at my school uses those hoses that connect to the bottom of a dedicated washing cylinder for film; the cylinders are advertised to completely change the water 3-4 times a minute; we run them for five minutes. Maybe this is a sophomoric assumption, but I figured that as long as there are 15-20 total changes of water, I'd be good. What I currently do, then, when using a inversion tank to develop film is:

    I empty the tank of fixer

    I fill the tank up completely with water once and dump it

    I fill the tank up with water to just barely cover the developing reels and dump it

    I repeat the "fill to the reels" step 15 times

    I repeat the "fill to the reels" step twice more with distilled water

    I remove the film from the reels and hang to dry

    Does this method sound plausible? I've read through this thread and, while there's lots of interesting discussions of chemistry, I couldn't apply it to my method. I figure (guess) that this method should be at least as effective as the Illford method.

  3. #123

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    Quote Originally Posted by thebdt View Post
    Maybe this is a sophomoric assumption, but I figured that
    as long as there are 15-20 total changes of water, I'd be
    good. What I currently do, then, when using a inversion
    tank to develop film is:

    I empty the tank of fixer - I fill the tank up completely
    with water once and dump it - I fill the tank up with
    water to just barely cover the developing reels and
    dump it - I repeat the "fill to the reels" step 15
    times - I repeat the "fill to the reels" step -
    twice more with distilled water
    Unbelievable. Extremely wasteful of water and time.
    I suggest you and the lab adopt the Ilford sequence
    or something similar for a wash routine.

    I perform the sequence somewhat leisurely allowing
    more time for the chemistry to diffuse outwardly.
    So little water is used that room temperature
    distilled does the job.

    Same for prints; still water soaks with print
    separators saves a Lot of water. Dan

  4. #124
    Micky's Avatar
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    I'm another that use the Ilford method. I haven't had any issues since switching to this method, as opposed to a continuos flow. I found the key to the method, as outlined above, is to let the water sit for five to ten minutes between agitations. First cycle is about seven agitations, second about fifteen, and the third is around twenty five. The biggest concern that I have is dust.

  5. #125

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    Quote Originally Posted by kodachrome64 View Post
    Wirelessly posted (BlackBerry 8300: BlackBerry8300/4.5.0.55 Profile/MIDP-2.0 Configuration/CLDC-1.1 VendorID/102)

    Just use the Ilford wash method for film. It's archival and uses a minimal amount of water.

    Nick
    +1 This is a very effective method for washing film. I always do a 5, 10, 20, 40, 80 cycle. Very environmentally friendly.
    Last edited by Juergen; 01-05-2010 at 03:13 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  6. #126

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    I too use the Ilford method for film wash, and have for a couple of years now with good results. I use distilled water only in the final step, a 30 second photo-flo bath.
    Roger

  7. #127
    odonoghue's Avatar
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    You cannot waste water - it will always flow to the sea unless evaporated into the atmosphere. What you can do is send it through your darkroom before it makes its way. A five minute rinse in the Jobo tank and then in distilled water with a wetting agent for roll films. Equivalent for sheet films in their trays. Prints: fill the bathtub one third and put your prints in. Shuffle them from time to time. I do this over a couple of hours -- but I don't hang around the bathroom -- just check in and shuffle from time to time. I've fiber based prints made over 20 years ago and they've held up just fine.

  8. #128

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    I've decided to stick with my method; it works for me. Also, my lab certainly isn't changing its methods based upon what someone said somewhere on some internet forum.

  9. #129
    michael9793's Avatar
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    permawash
    film 1min wash, 1 min permawash, 1 min wash they are archival
    paper DW 5 min wash, 5 min permawash, 5 min wash achival
    "Capturing an image is only one step of the long chain of events to create a beautiful Photograph” See my updated website: mandersenphotography.com

  10. #130

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    Quote Originally Posted by michael9793 View Post
    permawash
    film 1min wash, 1 min permawash, 1 min wash they are archival
    paper DW 5 min wash, 5 min permawash, 5 min wash achival
    Have you tested your prints for retained hypo?



 

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