Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 70,592   Posts: 1,546,034   Online: 954
      
Page 14 of 28 FirstFirst ... 489101112131415161718192024 ... LastLast
Results 131 to 140 of 275
  1. #131
    CBG
    CBG is offline

    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    894
    Quote Originally Posted by michael9793 View Post
    permawash
    film 1min wash, 1 min permawash, 1 min wash they are archival
    paper DW 5 min wash, 5 min Permawash, 5 min wash achival
    I'm not sure I'd trust Permawash's claimed numbers. They are so far off everyone else's results that I suspect they are unadulterated voodoo marketing hype.

    OK ... Lets talk prints, since paper based prints are the real test of washing. The numbers might work if you have one single very low key very dark print with little silver to be removed, fixed in pristine absolutely fresh unused rapid fix just mixed in two baths used something like the Ilford method, absolutely fresh unused Permawash just mixed, all for only that first single print being treated, and a deluge of water blasting over the print in an utterly wasteful manner.

    Maybe. Maybe for that first single print, if handled perfectly, just one print so all solutions are working at utmost performance. But I wouldn't trust the claims even for just one print. I can't see how any wash aid can so greatly outperform very similar competitors.

    I am sure Permawash is a very good product. I have used it. I have some now and use it without worry. Just not for such short process times. I don't believe in magic or miracles.

  2. #132
    ruilourosa's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Portugal
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    302
    hello

    i´ve been reading this thread and become curious...

    i´m doing my own rapid fixer adapting a old agfa formula (maybe 105 0r 108) and i mix this:

    h20 750ml 52ºc
    sodium thiosulfate - 200gr
    ammonium chloride - 40gr
    sodium metabisulfite - 20 gr
    borax - 20gr
    h2o to 1000ml

    it comes out just a bit acidic and almost odorless and i use one liter to fix around 10 films for 5 mins each at 20ºc running water

    for paper it´s around the same amonunt! when doing important stuff i use the two bath method

    always undiluted


    i wash the film for 20-30 mins and fb paper 45min-1hour 20º +-2º


    sometimes for film (mainly at home) i use this alcaline fixer


    h20 750ml 52ºc
    sodium thiosulfate - 200gr
    ammonium chloride - 40gr
    sodium sulfite - 15 gr
    borax - 12gr
    h2o to 1000ml


    it gets just a bit alcaline and has a faint ammonia smell

    clearing times are always under 30 seconds even in colder solutions

    for safety i always wash for 15-20min running water

    am i doing well?



    vive la resistance!

  3. #133

    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Willamette Valley, Oregon
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    3,684

    Unbelievable

    Quote Originally Posted by thebdt View Post
    I've decided to stick with my method; it works for me.
    That method, 15 to 20 changes of water, is a waste of
    time and water. A leisurely conducted Ilford sequence
    will allow some additional margin of safety and save
    a lot of water and one's time. Filling and dumping
    15 to 20 times is throwing water and one's time
    down the drain.

    To increase that margin of safety even farther keep
    a jug or two of room temperature wash water
    on hand. Dan

  4. #134

    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    The Land of the Yellow Box
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    109
    What do you think?
    Just contacted Ilford on their website and they recommended their usual 5, 10, 20 sequence if you use nonhardening fixer and to repeat the sequence twice (without wash aid) if you use a hardening fix. Sounds hard to believe but I would suppose they know better than I would. I'm tired of running scores of gallons of water down the drain just to wash one roll like Kodak recommends. Neither I nor the planet can afford that when I must go through dozens of rolls a month.

  5. #135
    MattKing's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Delta, British Columbia, Canada
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    12,405
    Images
    60
    37th Exposure:

    When you consider the Kodak recommendation, you should remember the flow rate suggested - one change of water every 5 minutes.

    That means if you are washing in a 1 liter tank, and use the flow rate recommended, you will use 4 to 6 liters of water in the 20 to 30 minutes required (per Kodak's data-sheets).
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  6. #136
    michael9793's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Fort Myers, Florida, USA
    Shooter
    ULarge Format
    Posts
    2,001
    Images
    111
    Why is this so hard. Buy permawash. 3oz per gal and good for some 80 rolls. Nonarchival is 1 min wash 1 min permawash then 1 min wash. Double for achival. All the other stuff is second best to permawash.
    "Capturing an image is only one step of the long chain of events to create a beautiful Photograph” See my updated website: mandersenphotography.com

  7. #137
    Photo Engineer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Rochester, NY
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    23,037
    Images
    65
    Do you guys all believe the hype, or do you actually test your films and papers for residual silver and hypo content with the appropriate test kits?

    I'll bet most of you don't and have never done it.

    PE

  8. #138

    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    1,544
    Quote Originally Posted by 37th Exposure View Post
    What do you think?
    Just contacted Ilford on their website and they recommended their usual 5, 10, 20 sequence if you use nonhardening fixer and to repeat the sequence twice (without wash aid) if you use a hardening fix. Sounds hard to believe but I would suppose they know better than I would. I'm tired of running scores of gallons of water down the drain just to wash one roll like Kodak recommends. Neither I nor the planet can afford that when I must go through dozens of rolls a month.
    I've kept with the Ilford method since I restarted my own B&W processing a couple of years ago. I always hated "wasting" water before...I'm not a fanatical environmentalist, just think that it's sensible to use our resources carefully.

  9. #139
    CBG
    CBG is offline

    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    894
    Quote Originally Posted by michael9793 View Post
    Why is this so hard. Buy permawash. 3oz per gal and good for some 80 rolls. Nonarchival is 1 min wash 1 min permawash then 1 min wash. Double for achival. All the other stuff is second best to permawash.
    I've said before, Permawash is a fine product as long as you don't believe their directions. Yes, it is a real wash aid. But, no, it's not magic. You can't get real washing that fast. Permawash is no better, and no worse, than all the various sulfite based wash aid products out there.

    Their directions and claims are hogwash.

    If you believe their statements, it's brainwash.

  10. #140
    SchwinnParamount's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Tacoma, WA
    Shooter
    4x5 Format
    Posts
    1,017
    Images
    42
    Quote Originally Posted by CBG View Post
    I'm not sure I'd trust Permawash's claimed numbers. They are so far off everyone else's results that I suspect they are unadulterated voodoo marketing hype.

    OK ... Lets talk prints, since paper based prints are the real test of washing. The numbers might work if you have one single very low key very dark print with little silver to be removed, fixed in pristine absolutely fresh unused rapid fix just mixed in two baths used something like the Ilford method, absolutely fresh unused Permawash just mixed, all for only that first single print being treated, and a deluge of water blasting over the print in an utterly wasteful manner.

    Maybe. Maybe for that first single print, if handled perfectly, just one print so all solutions are working at utmost performance. But I wouldn't trust the claims even for just one print. I can't see how any wash aid can so greatly outperform very similar competitors.

    I am sure Permawash is a very good product. I have used it. I have some now and use it without worry. Just not for such short process times. I don't believe in magic or miracles.
    Not that I am being a negative-nelly just to be mean but... how do you know it works? The best test for proper fixing is to look at a print in say... 5 years to see if it has suffered from insufficient wash after fix. Have you been using the product that long?



 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin