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  1. #191

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    What is the best way to test for retained fix in films and papers?

  2. #192
    Greg Davis's Avatar
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    Kodak HT-2 test. It is a solution of distilled water, acetic acid, and silver nitrate that darkens in contact with residual fixer. The formula is online and in several older Kodak darkroom dataguides.
    www.gregorytdavis.com

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  3. #193

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    I didn't read every post in this thread but I am interested in saving water since I live in Southern California and we are always in a drought or a water shortage.

    I was just wondering if anyone is filtering or recycling their water? I am thinking of using an aquarium set up were the water is run thru a filtration system. Most aquarium filtration systems use activated carbon to trap most impurities. A pre filter can also be used. Bio beeds would not be needed since there isn't any bio waste. If water changes seem to be the most important part of washing film or paper. Why not use an air pump to lift the fixer off the film or paper. The air pump would act as an agitation, much the same way it does in a nitrogen burst developing system. The air pump would keep the water moving and keep it moving over the film or paper. The circulation pump can run the water thru the filtration system. I have aquarium enclosed filtration cannisters that flow 100 gallons per hour, and larger ones are available on the market. Has anyone tried this setup before? If you have what are the pros and cons?

  4. #194
    Photo Engineer's Avatar
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    Read the definitive washing thread recenly posted here with real data.

    PE

  5. #195
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    Harry Pulley - Visit the BLIND PRINT EXCHANGE FORUM

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  6. #196
    Photo Engineer's Avatar
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    Thanks Harry. I could not find that! Old age.

    PE

  7. #197
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    Heico perm wash film 1 mim wash 1 min perm wash 1 min wash archival. Paper no longer than 5 mins. Don't screw around with all this crap. I have used it for 30 years works great. Min water usage.
    "Capturing an image is only one step of the long chain of events to create a beautiful Photograph” See my updated website: mandersenphotography.com

  8. #198

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    Running water.

  9. #199

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    Washing in running water is the best, to cut your wash time, use a Hypo clearing solution, it is fairy cheap and will cut your washing time by 50 to 60 percent. Fix for as twice as long as it takes to clear, thats all the film needs, if your film clears in 2 minutes, fix it for 4 minutes total.(including the first 2 minutes). The less time the film spends in the fixer, the less excess hypo clear and your will have a shorter wash time.

    You should also use a hypo clearing solution with your fiber base prints, it greatly reduces the prints wash time.

    P

  10. #200

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    "The less time the film spends in the fixer, the less excess hypo clear and your will have a shorter wash time."

    Not sure about this... since a film has no fiber unlike FB papers. So an extended fixing time doesn't mean you'll have to extend the washing time.



 

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